Experience Anu

Experience Anu

Synopsis

The ANU campus is always alive with plenty to see, hear and do.Listen here to one of the many fascinating talks delivered by the worlds finest thinkers. If youre interested in finding out more about events at ANU then visit us at events.anu.edu.

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Episodes

  • In conversation with William Dalrymple
    In conversation with William Dalrymple
    Duration: 51min | 30/10/2019

    William Dalrymple is in conversation with Meera Ashar on William's new book, The Anarchy. The Relentless Rise of the East India Company. In his most ambitious and riveting book to date, The Anarchy, William Dalrymple tells the timely and cautionary tale of the rise of the East India Company, the first global corporate power. In August 1765 the East India Company defeated the young Mughal emperor and forced him to establish in his richest provinces a new administration run by English merchants who collected taxes through means of a ruthless private army - what we would now call an act of involuntary privatisation. The East India Company became something much more unusual: an aggressive colonial power in the guise of a multinational business. In less than four decades it had trained up a security force of around 200,000 men - twice the size of the British army - and had subdued an entire subcontinent, conquering first Bengal and finally, in 1803, the Mughal capital of Delhi itself. The Company's reach stretch

  • The First Eight Project: So much more than a Prime Minister - Andrew Fisher (1862-1928)
    The First Eight Project: So much more than a Prime Minister - Andrew Fisher (1862-1928)
    Duration: 01h11min | 30/10/2019

    Recorded at Australia House, London on 22 October 2019 with introduction by the Hon George Brandis QC, High Commissioner to the United Kingdom. The remarkable contribution to Australian political life made by Andrew Fisher, Australia’s fifth Prime Minister, has only just begun to receive a measure of the recognition it deserves. Employed as a pit boy in the Scottish coal mines as a nine-year old, Fisher eventually migrated to Queensland aged 22, in 1885, and shortly after joined the fledgling Queensland Labor Party. While never a charismatic politician, he was liked on both sides of the political divide for his honesty, integrity and unswerving dedication to the attainment of a more just Australia. Prime Minister no less than three times (between 1908 and 1915), and the first Prime Minister to enjoy a majority in both houses of Parliament, his governments legislated on the basis of fairness. His word was his bond. Fisher is probably best known for his statement at the outset of the Great War that Austr

  • Chat 10 Looks 3 LIVE with Leigh Sales  Annabel Crabb
    Chat 10 Looks 3 LIVE with Leigh Sales & Annabel Crabb
    Duration: 01h20min | 12/12/2017

    Lock up your tubas and your fairy wrens! In partnership with ANU Meet The Authors series, Chat 10 Looks 3 comes to Canberra for a live recording of the beloved podcast's bumper Christmas episode. Leigh Sales and Annabel Crabb discuss their favourite books, TV shows, movies and recipes from 2017. Make a list of what to read in your Christmas holidays! Note ideas for the perfect gifts! Crabb's rider includes a fully stocked bar and the removal of all pianos from the premises while Sales just wants to know if ANU is providing a driver.

  • Books that Changed Humanity: Daodejing (Tao Te Ching)
    Books that Changed Humanity: Daodejing (Tao Te Ching)
    Duration: 01h21min | 26/05/2017

    Associate Professor Ben Penny discusses the significance of the Classical Chinese text 'Daodejing' ('Tao Te Ching'). Books that Changed Humanity is a book club with a difference. Each month, the ANU Humanities Research Centre hosts an expert from one of a variety of disciplines, who will introduce and lead the discussion of a major historical text. All of these texts, which are drawn from a variety of cultural traditions, has had a formative influence on society and humanity. The series aims to highlight and revisit those books which have informed the way we understand ourselves, both individually and collectively, as human beings. hrc.anu.edu.au/books-that-changed-humanity

  • Voter interest hits record low in 2016 - ANU Election Study
    Voter interest hits record low in 2016 - ANU Election Study
    Duration: 38min | 20/12/2016

    In this podcast, Professor Ian McAllister, Dr Jill Sheppard and Sarah Cameron reveal the results of the latest Australian Election Study live from Parliament House. Spoiler: The 2016 survey shows significant changes of opinion that should act as a wake-up call to the major parties.

  • The Secret Coldwar with John Blaxland
    The Secret Coldwar with John Blaxland
    Duration: 38min | 15/11/2016

    This talk gives an insiders account of Australia's national intelligence organisation as it grappled with continuing espionage from foreign agents and the rise of terrorist attacks on Australian soil during the years of the Fraser and Hawke governments. John Blaxland uncovers behind the scenes stories of the Hilton bombing in Sydney, assassinations of diplomats, the Combe-Ivanov affair, and the new threat from China. It reveals that KGB officers were able to recruit and run agents in Australia for many years, and it follows ASIO's own investigations into persistent allegations of penetration by Soviet moles.

  • Professor Leif Wenar on Blood Oil
    Professor Leif Wenar on Blood Oil
    Duration: 45min | 11/11/2016

    Natural resources are the biggest source of unaccountable power in the world. For decades resource-fuelled authoritarians and extremists have forced endless crises on the West—and the ultimate source of their resource money is consumers, paying at the gas station and the mall. Leif Wenar explores how the ‘resource curse’ threatens the West—and searches for the hidden global rule that puts shoppers into business with today’s most dangerous men. He discovers the same rule that once licensed the slave trade and genocide and apartheid—a rule whose abolition has marked humanity’s greatest victories, yet that still breeds tyranny and war and extremism through today’s global resource trade. Australia could now abolish this archaic law for resources—and lead the world to lift its oil curse. Leif Wenar holds the Chair of Philosophy and Law at King’s College London. He has been a Visiting Professor at ANU, Stanford and Princeton, and a Fellow of the Carnegie Council Program in Justice and the World Economy.

  • Conversations across the creek #5
    Conversations across the creek #5
    Duration: 43min | 09/11/2016

    Evolution was the theme of the fifth in the Conversations Across the Creek series. Our speakers tackled this subject from their differing research viewpoints: the philosophy of biology; phylogenetics and why some things evolve faster than others; the migration of people in the Pacific; and communication in healthcare. This session’s speakers were: Dr Rachael Brown (School of Philosophy; College of Arts and Social Sciences), Dr Rob Lanfear (Research School of Biology; College of Medicine, Biology and Environment), Dr Hilary Howes (School of Archaeology and Anthropology; College of Arts and Social Sciences), Professor Diana Slade (School of Literature, Languages and Linguistics; College of Arts and Social Sciences). The Conversations Across the Creek series is an initiative of the Humanities Research Centre and the Centre for the Public Awareness of Science. ‘Conversations’ seeks to highlight the commonalities and interesting intersections that exist across the university through TED-style talks delivered by

  • 2006 Last Lecture - Professor Chris Reus-Smit
    2006 Last Lecture - Professor Chris Reus-Smit
    Duration: 37min | 20/10/2016

    The inaugural 2006 Last Lecture was given by Professor Chris Reus-Smit. Professor Reus-Smit delivered a fascinating lecture on the topic of 'Sources of Insecurity and Instability in the Contemporary World'. With a long teaching experience and exceptional rapport with students, it is no wonder so many students wanted to hear Professor Reus-Smit speak at the Last Lecture! He self-evidently loves teaching, and gives to his classes the same enthusiasm he has given to his many publications, including American Power and World Order (Polity Press) and the Oxford Handbook on International Relations. Despite his less than formal high school education, Chris’s intellect has been recognised. At ANU in 2006 he was a Professor, the Head of the Department of International Relations in the Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, and Deputy Director of RSPAS.

  • Books that Changed Humanity - On the Origin of Species
    Books that Changed Humanity - On the Origin of Species
    Duration: 59min | 17/10/2016

    Books that Changed Humanity is a book club with a difference. Each month, the ANU Humanities Research Centre hosts an expert from one of a variety of disciplines, who will introduce and lead the discussion of a major historical text. All of these texts, which are drawn from a variety of cultural traditions, has had a formative influence on society and humanity. The series aims to highlight and revisit those books which have informed the way we understand ourselves, both individually and collectively, as human beings. Professor Iain McCalman gave the third lecture about On the Origin of Species. Prof. McCalman is professor of history and the humanities at the University of Sydney. http://hrc.anu.edu.au/events/books-changed-humanity-3-origin-species

  • Antony Green, ABC Elections Analyst, visits ANU
    Antony Green, ABC Elections Analyst, visits ANU
    Duration: 02h41min | 14/10/2016

    ABC elections analyst, Antony Green, spoke at the ANU School of Politics and International Relations on 12 October 2016. In a lively and entertaining with students and staff, he discusses the findings of his analysis of the 2016 Senate Federal election and the implications of the Senate's new voting system. Placing these changes in their historical context, he finds that the new system has worked well and that some of the more surprising results were likely the result of the double dissolution rather than the reforms. Antony also discusses some possible future implications for the change

  • 8th H C Nugget Coombs Lecture - Unhappy anniversaries: what is there to celebrate?
    8th H C Nugget Coombs Lecture - Unhappy anniversaries: what is there to celebrate?
    Duration: 46min | 11/10/2016

    For the Northern Territory, 2016 is the year of two big anniversaries: the 50th anniversary of the Wave Hill walk-off and the 40th anniversary of the Commonwealth Parliament's passing the Northern Territory Aboriginal Land Rights Act. Next year will also mark the 10th anniversary of the Commonwealth's Northern Territory Emergency Response - the Intervention. What benefits have government policies delivered to Indigenous peoples over those decades? How would Nugget Coombs rate the quality of advice and programs that have emanated from government bureaucracies, NGOs and powerful individuals, as they have applied to Indigenous affairs? The passage of the Aboriginal Land Rights Act remains its acme. Aboriginal people in the Northern Territory have been so distracted gaining, then defending, their rights that they simply have not secured their future. Developing the North is a hollow mantra without real inclusion of Indigenous peoples: the need for them to be consulted is ignored and self-management continu

  • Don Watson - American politics in the time of Trump
    Don Watson - American politics in the time of Trump
    Duration: 57min | 14/09/2016

    Don Watson joins Professor Bates Gill in conversation to discuss his new Quarterly Essay, 'Enemy Within. American Politics in the Time of Trump' which takes the reader on a journey into the heart of the United States in the year 2016. Watson, with characteristic wit and acuity, places Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders in a larger frame. He considers the irresistible pull - for Americans - of American exceptionalism, and asks whether this creed is reaching its limit. He explores alternative paths the United States could have taken, and asks where its present course might lead Australia as a dutiful ally. "The best book by an outsider about America since - forever," David Sedaris, on Don Watson's American Journeys. Don Watson is a historian, author and public speaker. After writing political satire for Max Gillies and speeches for the Victorian premier John Cain, he became Paul Keating's speechwriter in 1992 and wrote the award winning biography Recollections of a Bleeding Heart: Paul Keating P

  • Anthony Albanese and Karen Middleton in conversation with Alex Sloan
    Anthony Albanese and Karen Middleton in conversation with Alex Sloan
    Duration: 56min | 12/09/2016

    'Albanese: Telling it Straight' is Karen Middleton's new biography of Anthony Albanese. Through interviews with more than 70 friends, relatives, colleagues, associates and adversaries, and more than 40 interviews with Albanese himself, respected political journalist Karen Middleton has gained unprecedented insight into the man behind the politician; a beloved son brought-up with a strong sense of social justice, a political activist with a firebrand reputation; a charismatic young leader; an independent thinker who antagonized both the soft-left and the right of his own party; a strategist with a remarkable memory and an uncanny knack for numbers. Middleton charts the trajectory of Albanese's political career detailing the student shenanigans and factional power-plays of his rise through Young Labor; the influence of his mentor, Tom Uren; the manoeuvring ahead of his preselection - and eventual election - as Member for Grayndler in Sydney's inner west; his years in Opposition, and finally, the role he played

  • Books that Changed Humanity – The Communist Manifesto
    Books that Changed Humanity – The Communist Manifesto
    Duration: 01h07min | 12/09/2016

    Books that Changed Humanity is a book club with a difference. Each month, the ANU Humanities Research Centre hosts an expert from one of a variety of disciplines, who will introduce and lead the discussion of a major historical text. All of these texts, which are drawn from a variety of cultural traditions, has had a formative influence on society and humanity. The series aims to highlight and revisit those books which have informed the way we understand ourselves, both individually and collectively, as human beings. Dr Rick Kuhn gave the second lecture on ‘The Communist Manifesto.’ Dr Kuhn is an Honorary Associate Professor, Marxian economist and ANU Adjunct Reader in Sociology. http://hrc.anu.edu.au/events/books-changed-humanity-2-communist-manifesto

  • ANU/The Canberra Times meet the author event with Goenawan Mohamad
    ANU/The Canberra Times meet the author event with Goenawan Mohamad
    Duration: 55min | 06/09/2016

    Acclaimed Indonesian writer and man of letters, Goenawan Mohamad joins ANU Emeritus Professor James Fox in conversation on Goenawan's new book, In Other Words, a volume of essays edited and translated by Jennifer Lindsay, who also participated in the conversation. In this podcast Jennifer discusses some challenges of selecting and translating Goenawan's essays, written between 1968 to 2014, which demonstrate the breadth of his perceptive and elegant commentary on literature, faith, mythology, politics, history and Indonesian life. Goenawan Mohamad has been at the forefront of Indonesian intellectual and cultural life since his early twenties, and a crusader for press freedom since his university days. He was founder of the Indonesian language weekly journal Tempo in 1971 and its chief editor from 1971-94, and again in 1998. In the last seventeen years, Goenawan has been particularly involved with establishing alternative spaces for cultural and intellectual activity in Jakarta, writing, and as theatre dir

  • Inaugural PhB (Bachelor of Philosophy) symposium
    Inaugural PhB (Bachelor of Philosophy) symposium
    Duration: 01h15min | 06/09/2016

    Introduction by Boyd Hunter (PhB Convenor, CASS) Launching the 2016 PhB Symposium—Professor Brian Schmidt (Vice Chancellor, ANU) Ten PhB Student Presentations (in order) 1. Possibilities for innovative Native Title mapping—Mia Sandgren (PhB CASS) 2. How can playing ‘molecular Lego’ help us to understand the malaria parasite?—Lachlan Arthur (PhB Science) 3. Diagnosing Bottled Stars—Adrian Hindes (PhB Science) 4. Chemical Keyrings—Todd Harris (PhB Science) 5. Digital disruption in the academy—Oliver Friedmann (PhB CAP) 6. Writing Wrongs: Women and the Glass Ceiling of Literature—Rosalind Moran (PhB CASS) 7. Poking at Vibrations in Crystals—Kay Song (PhB Science) 8. Chemical weavings and coloured nets—Benjamin Thompson (PhB Science) 9. Gifted Underachievement: Causes and Interventions—Jessy Wu (PhB CASS) 10. Walt Whitman’s Civil War Poetry: Transcendentalism … or Jingoism?—Harry Dalton (PhB CASS)

  • Big questions in biology: Australia’s biodiversity, its past, present and future
    Big questions in biology: Australia’s biodiversity, its past, present and future
    Duration: 01h23min | 05/09/2016

    In this discussion forum, four internationally recognised researchers will present their own research on different aspects of Australian biodiversity. They will look back at historical evidence to show how Australian plants and animals evolved and what factors have influenced them. By analysing the variety of animals and plants in Australia today, the researchers will propose ways they can be managed, protected and used effectively. The presenters then come together in a panel moderated by Dr Rod Lamberts (Deputy Director of the Australian National Centre for the Public Awareness of Science) to discuss the future of Australia's biodiversity and what factors, including climate change, are likely to influence it. Researchers Dr Marcel Cardillo, ANU Research School of Biology Professor Craig Moritz, Centre for Biodiversity Analysis, ANU Research School of Biology Dr Carsten Kulheim, ANU Research School of Biology Professor Adrienne Nicotra, ANU Research School of Biology

  • ANU/Canberra times meet the author event with Justin Cronin
    ANU/Canberra times meet the author event with Justin Cronin
    Duration: 01h02min | 05/09/2016

    Bestselling American author Justin Cronin - in his only Canberra appearance between the Melbourne and Brisbane Writers Festival - discusses his life and books with Colin Steele, particularly his recently completed post-apocalyptic Passage trilogy. The Weekend Australian has commented that the trilogy,The Passage (2010), The Twelve(2012) and The City of Mirrors (2016), is "part dystopian essay, FBI procedural, vampire saga and military novel. There are echoes of John Steinbeck, Cormac McCarthy, Bram Stoker, Tom Clancy and Stephen King". King himself has commented that the trilogy "is remarkable for the unremitting drive of its narrative, for the breathtaking sweep of its imagined future, and for the clear lucidity of its language". Film rights have been sold to Ridley Scott. Harvard educated Cronin is also the author of Mary and O'Neil (which won the PEN/Hemingway Award and the Stephen Crane Prize), and The Summer Guest. He has been a Fellow of the US National Endowment for the Arts and is a Distinguished Fa

  • ANU/The Canberra Times meet the author event with Peter Stefanovic
    ANU/The Canberra Times meet the author event with Peter Stefanovic
    Duration: 59min | 05/09/2016

    Peter is joined in conversation by Jack Waterford AM, former Editor-at-large at The Canberra Times to discuss his new book Hack in a Flak Jacket. Hack in a Flak Jacket is a startlingly honest account of experiencing war and terrorism from the frontline by Peter Stefanovic, one of Australia's leading journalists and foreign correspondents. For almost ten years Peter Stefanovic was Channel 9's foreign correspondent in Europe, Africa and the Middle East. During that time he witnessed more than his fair share of death and destruction - all while putting his own personal safety very much in the firing line. This is his memoir of those experiences - from wars and conflicts in the Middle East, to terrorist attacks in London and Norway through to royal weddings. His time spent covering these world events has opened his eyes to the human condition - and in many ways affected him personally. Peter Stefanovic was the Europe, Africa, and Middle East correspondent for the Nine Network, from 2008 to 2015. He reported fr

  • Conversations Across the Creek #4
    Conversations Across the Creek #4
    Duration: 45min | 29/08/2016

    The fourth in the Conversations Across the Creek series was a lively discussion about ethical issues with various technologies such as drones used in warfare, Artificial Intelligence, the benefits and concerns with police body cameras, and machine learning. This session’s speakers were: Dr Adam Henschke (National Security College; College of Asia & Pacific), Professor Marcus Hutter (Research School of Computer Science), Dr Emmeline Taylor (School of Sociology; College of Arts and Social Sciences), Associate Professor Lexing Xie (Research School of Computer Science). The Conversations Across the Creek series is an initiative of the Humanities Research Centre and the Centre for the Public Awareness of Science. ‘Conversations’ seeks to highlight the commonalities and interesting intersections that exist across the university through TED-style talks delivered by academics from both sides of Sullivan’s Creek.

  • Books that Changed Humanity - The Ramayana
    Books that Changed Humanity - The Ramayana
    Duration: 01h08min | 16/08/2016

    Books that Changed Humanity is a book club with a difference. Each month, the ANU Humanities Research Centre hosts an expert from one of a variety of disciplines, who will introduce and lead the discussion of a major historical text. All of these texts, which are drawn from a variety of cultural traditions, has had a formative influence on society and humanity. The series aims to highlight and revisit those books which have informed the way we understand ourselves, both individually and collectively, as human beings. Dr McComas Taylor gave the inaugural lecture on The Ramayana, the Indian epic. Dr Taylor is a Reader in Sanskrit in the ANU College of Asia & the Pacific. http://hrc.anu.edu.au/books-that-changed-humanity

  • Emeritus Faculty Annual Lecture 2016: Understanding the value of arts and culture
    Emeritus Faculty Annual Lecture 2016: Understanding the value of arts and culture
    Duration: 49min | 04/08/2016

    Delivered by Professor Geoffrey Crossick, Director of the United Kingdom’s Arts and Humanities Research Council's Cultural Value Project and author, with Patrycja Kaszynska, of the major 2016 Report: Understanding the Value of Arts & Culture. This talk highlights the diverse contexts of the value of culture and how the digital landscape is playing an increasingly larger role in shaping people’s engagement with arts and culture. Crossick asks: How should we understand the difference that arts and culture makes to individuals and to society? The case is too often presented in terms of benefits that are thought to be important to the government of the day while neglecting some of the more fundamental benefits that matter to us all. Professor Crossick was Chief Executive of the Arts and Humanities Research Board from 2002–05, Warden of Goldsmiths College from 2005–10 and Vice-Chancellor of London University from 2010-12.

  • 2016 John Passmore Lecture – Changing visions of an egalitarian society
    2016 John Passmore Lecture – Changing visions of an egalitarian society
    Duration: 58min | 04/08/2016

    The 2016 John Passmore Lecture for the ANU School of Philosophy By Professor Elizabeth Anderson, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, John Dewey Distinguished University Professor of Philosophy and Women's Studies at the University of Michigan How should a society of equals be organized? Egalitarians themselves have been divided among three visions: individualism, small-scale communalist or cooperativist systems, and large-scale collectivism. In this podcast, Professor Elizabeth Anderson examines why, during the 19th century, the dominant trend among egalitarians moved from individualist toward collectivist visions. Far from settling on the communalist vision as the best compromise between the two, egalitarians today favour a mix of individualist and collectivist institutions. This talk considers why this is so, and discusses some challenges posed by this mixture.

  • 2016 Jack Smart Memorial Lecture – Cognition as a social skill
    2016 Jack Smart Memorial Lecture – Cognition as a social skill
    Duration: 02h56min | 04/08/2016

    Most contemporary social epistemology takes as its starting point individuals with sophisticated propositional attitudes and considers (i) how those individuals depend on each other to gain (or lose) knowledge through testimony, disagreement, and the like and (ii) if, in addition to individual knowers, it is possible for groups to have knowledge. In this podcast, Professor Sally Haslanger argues that social epistemology should be more attentive to the construction of knowers through social and cultural practices: socialization shapes our psychological and practical orientation so that we perform local social practices fluently.

  • Richard Fidler in conversation with Alex Sloan
    Richard Fidler in conversation with Alex Sloan
    Duration: 01h12s | 04/08/2016

    Richard Fidler joins ABC 666 Canberra's Alex Sloan in conversation to discuss his new book, Ghost Empire, his popular ABC radio series, Conversations with Richard Fidler, and the Doug Anthony All Stars. Recorded on 28 July 2016 at University House.

  • The Vote: 2016 Federal Election Series - Pre-election analysis
    The Vote: 2016 Federal Election Series - Pre-election analysis
    Duration: 57min | 30/06/2016

    In this animated political discussion some of the University's most renowned public policy experts provide a final analysis of the election campaign prior to polling day. Panellists Professor John Hewson Tax and Transfer Policy Institute, Crawford School of Public Policy Adjunct Professor Bob McMullan Crawford School of Public Policy Dr Jill Sheppard ANU Centre for Social Research and Methods Star of 'Off the Hill', the University's weekly 2016 election wrap up Dr Andrew Hughes Research School of Management, ANU College of Business of Economics Star of 'Off the Hill', the University's weekly 2016 election wrap up Moderated by Paul Bongiorno AM contributing editor for Ten News. The Vote: 2016 Federal Election Series is an opportunity to engage with ANU public policy experts during the 2016 Federal Election.

  • The Vote: 2016 Federal Election Series - Climate Change, Energy and the Environment
    The Vote: 2016 Federal Election Series - Climate Change, Energy and the Environment
    Duration: 01h07min | 28/06/2016

    ANU is a leading centre for the study of climate change, energy change and the environment. In this event ANU experts discuss how these issues are being presented during the election. Panellists: Professor Ken Baldwin Director, Energy Change Institute, ANU Professor Mark Howden Director, Climate Change Institute, ANU Dr Paul Burke Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU Lily Dempster Climate Campaigner and ANU student Mark Kenny - moderator Chief Political Correspondent, Fairfax Media The Vote: 2016 Federal Election Series is an opportunity to engage with ANU public policy experts during the 2016 Federal Election.

  • The periodical enlightenment  romantic literature
    The periodical enlightenment & romantic literature
    Duration: 48min | 28/06/2016

    The ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences' Second Professoriate Lecture of 2016 - The periodical enlightenment & romantic literature The opening decades of the nineteenth century, which we know as the Age of Romanticism in Britain, was also the great age of periodical literature – The Periodical Enlightenment – at the centre of which were the Edinburgh Review (est. 1802), the Quarterly Review (1809), Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine (or Maga) (1817), and the Westminster Review (1824), each offering a politically-inflected conspectus of current knowledge and creative literature that was often aggressively argumentative and assumed greater authority than either the author or the reader. The big Reviews were by no means the only places where the Romantic reader could find clever, scathing, but often well-informed and well-argued reviews, which contributed to the high degree of literary self-consciousness we associate with Romantic literature. This talk looks at the phenomenon of critical reviewing during the

  • After Stella: taking stock of gender and literature in Australia
    After Stella: taking stock of gender and literature in Australia
    Duration: 01h09min | 16/06/2016

    The past five years have seen a concerted attempt by feminists in the literary world to reveal and shift gender bias in reviewing, awards and publishing. This discussion brings figures from across the literary landscape - writers’ festivals, publishing, reviewing, and academia - to discuss what this literary activism has achieved, and what is left to do. Is the gendering of literature in Australia changing, and why? Speakers: • Dr Julieanne Lamond, lecturer, School of Literature Languages & Linguistics (Facilitator) • Lisa Dempster, Festival Director at Melbourne Writers Festival • Dr Melinda Harvey, Monash University literary studies academic and critic • Imogen Mathew, ANU PhD candidate and 2015 Stella counter • Ashley Orr, ANU PhD candidate and 2015 Stella counter • Zoya Patel, Editor of feminist literature and arts journal Feminartsy and 2015 ACT Young Woman of the Year This public discussion is presented by the ANU School of Literature, Languages and Linguistics and supported by the ANU Gender Institu

  • The Vote: 2016 Federal Election Series - Health
    The Vote: 2016 Federal Election Series - Health
    Duration: 59min | 15/06/2016

    Health policy is at the core of the 2016 Federal Election, regularly ranked as the issue most important to voters. In this event, ANU health policy experts discuss where the parties stand and what's missing from the debate. Panellists: Professor Sharon Friel Director, RegNet, ANU Professor Art Sedrakyan Department of Health Services Research and Policy, Research School of Population Health, ANU Professor Adrian Kay Director of National Professional Development, Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU Moderated by Cath McGrath, Chief Political Correspondent for SBS TV The Vote: 2016 Federal Election Series presented in partnership with the ANU Policy Forum is an opportunity to engage with ANU public policy experts during the 2016 Federal Election. Join the ANU community at a weekly panel in the Molonglo Theatre at the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy as experts discuss a different public policy issue every week until the election.

  • Public lecture by UN Privacy Rapporteur, Joe Cannataci
    Public lecture by UN Privacy Rapporteur, Joe Cannataci
    Duration: 01h10min | 14/06/2016

    The human right to privacy raises global policy, legal and political challenges in the information age. Issues such as data retention, data breaches and the interaction between public security versus private autonomy, are all creating a diversity of public debates in Australia and around the world. In 2015 the UN Human Rights Council responded to these challenges with the appointment of the first Rapporteur for Privacy; Professor Joseph (Joe) Cannataci. His appointment is a significant global milestone in the protection of privacy as a fundamental human right and his work has already attracted significant new interest, debate and awareness of privacy issues. In this talk, as part of Privacy Awareness Week 2016, Professor Cannataci provides his views as a world leading authority in privacy and data protection rights. About the speaker Professor Joe Cannataci: was appointed UN Special Rapporteur on the right to privacy in July 2015. He is the Head of the Department of Information Policy & Governance at the

  • The Vote: 2016 Federal Election Series - Social Policy
    The Vote: 2016 Federal Election Series - Social Policy
    Duration: 59min | 08/06/2016

    In this event some of the social policy issues most important to voters will be discussed by an experienced group of policy makers and researchers. Panellists: Professor Matt Gray Director, ANU Centre for Social Research and Methods Professor Peter Whiteford Crawford School of Public Policy Sue Regan Crawford School of Public Policy Associate Professor Sharon Bessell Crawford School of Public Policy Moderated by 666 ABC Canberra's Genevieve Jacobs The Vote: 2016 Federal Election Series is an opportunity to engage with ANU public policy experts during the 2016 Federal Election. Join the ANU community at a weekly panel in the Molonglo Theatre at the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy as experts discuss a different public policy issue every week until the election.

  • The Vote: 2016 Federal Election Series - Tax and the Economy
    The Vote: 2016 Federal Election Series - Tax and the Economy
    Duration: 58min | 01/06/2016

    Some of the University's most respected economic experts discuss the key tax and economic issues during the 2016 election campaign. Spoiler alert: there's slightly more to the Australian budget predicament than 'jobs and growth'. Panellists: Professor Miranda Stewart Director, Tax and Transfer Policy Institute Associate Professor Maria Racionero Research School of Economics, ANU Dr John Hewson Professor, Tax and Transfer Policy Institute at Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU Leader of the Liberal Party 1990 - 1994 Moderated by Steven Long, ABC

  • The Vote: 2016 Federal Election Series - Security and Foreign Affairs
    The Vote: 2016 Federal Election Series - Security and Foreign Affairs
    Duration: 01h01min | 25/05/2016

    Three of the University's leading security and foreign affairs experts look at how the 2016 election might change the way Australia deals with the rest of the world. Panellists: Professor Rory Medcalf Director, National Security College, Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU College of Asia and the Pacific Professor Michael Wesley Director, Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs, ANU College of Asia and the Pacific Dr Jill Sheppard Political scientist and survey researcher in the Australian Centre for Applied Social Research Methods, ANU College of Arts and Social Science Moderated by Michael Brissenden, ABC Watch vision of the event at https://youtu.be/0b09e9Qh2Hs

  • Conversations Across the Creek #3
    Conversations Across the Creek #3
    Duration: 36min | 24/05/2016

    The third in the Conversations Across the Creek series was a lively discussion about neuroscience, the dangerous ideas and influences when performing Shakespearean plays in 19th century Australia, battles between invaders and hosts in bacteria, and the analysis and scalability of history and music. This session’s speakers were: Professor Greg Stuart (Head of the Eccles Institute of Neuroscience at the John Curtin School of Medical Research), Dr Kate Flaherty (School of Literature, Languages and Linguistics), Dr Denisse Leyton (Research School of Biology) and Professor Paul Pickering (Dean, College of Arts and Social Sciences. Hosted by Director of the Humanities Research Centre Professor Will Christie. The Conversations Across the Creek series is an initiative of the Humanities Research Centre and the Centre for the Public Awareness of Science. ‘Conversations’ seeks to highlight the commonalities and interesting intersections that exist across the university through TED-style talks delivered by academics f

  • Balancing the books? Post-budget policy analysis
    Balancing the books? Post-budget policy analysis
    Duration: 01h25min | 24/05/2016

    This diverse group of panel members from academia, public policy and the media offer their thoughts on the 2016 budget, particularly in the context of what needs to be done both to prepare Australia to deal with the current domestic and global environments and for the medium term future. Convened by Mr Steve Sedgwick AO Deputy Chair, Sir Roland Wilson Foundation, Former Australian Public Service Commissioner Speakers Ms Michelle Grattan AO Chief Political Correspondent at The Conversation & Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra Ms Jan Harris Board member, Bendigo Bank & former Deputy Secretary to the Treasury Dr John Hewson AM Former leader of the Opposition & Chair, Tax and Transfer Policy Institute, Crawford School of Public Policy, Australian National University Dr Mike Keating AC Former Secretary of the Departments of Prime Minister and Cabinet, and Finance Prof Warwick McKibbin AO Chair, ANU Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, Australian National Un

  • Lining up the ducks: a rare insight into how impossible policies become possible
    Lining up the ducks: a rare insight into how impossible policies become possible
    Duration: 01h20min | 23/05/2016

    Rt Hon Patricia Hewitt, Professor Bruce Chapman and Dr Ken Henry reflect on their experiences of how power, politics and personality have influenced the ability to introduce innovative policy both here in Australia and in the UK. Using examples such as the policy response to the Global Financial Crisis, the Higher Education Contribution Scheme and the UK’s Congestion Charge, they explore what did and didn’t work in these contexts, the personalities involved and what lessons can be drawn for introducing future complex policies.

  • US Middle East Policy under President Obama and his successor
    US Middle East Policy under President Obama and his successor
    Duration: 49min | 12/05/2016

    There is a widespread view among analysts and policy makers in the Middle East region and beyond that President Barack Obama’s handling of the oil-rich but volatile Middle East has not been deft. His policy actions or lack of them have contributed to regional instability, and disillusioned some of America’s traditional Arab allies, most importantly Saudi Arabia. President Obama has been criticized for not containing the influence of Saudi Arabia’s regional rival, the Islamic Republic of Iran, and therefore the current American administration has been accused of playing into the hands of Tehran, whether in Iraq or Syria or Yemen. The position of the United States has also suffered in other parts of the region. The Arab Spring has come and largely gone, leaving the United States in lower standing in Egypt. The US-led peace talks between Israel and Palestine have failed, despite Secretary Kerry’s energetic efforts. How does Obama’s policy in the Middle East compare to that of the two leading presiden

  • The Vote: 2016 Federal Election Series - Policy, Politics and Predictions
    The Vote: 2016 Federal Election Series - Policy, Politics and Predictions
    Duration: 59min | 11/05/2016

    The Vote: 2016 Federal Election Series, presented in partnership with Policy Forum.net, is an opportunity to engage with ANU public policy experts during the 2016 Federal Election. In this podcast, three ANU public policy experts offer a no holds barred overview of the election, looking at the policy, politics and predictions ahead of us for the next eight weeks. Panellists include: - Quentin Grafton, Professor of Economics, ANU Crawford School of Public Policy, and Editor-in-Chief of PolicyForum.net - Sue Regan, researcher and policy analyst, ANU Crawford School of Public Policy - Bob Cotton, Visiting Fellow, ANU Crawford School of Public Policy Moderated by Catherine McGrath, Chief Political Correspondent for SBS TV.

  • Eat, drink and be artistic with Ken Done
    Eat, drink and be artistic with Ken Done
    Duration: 01h06min | 02/05/2016

    Iconic Australian, Ken Done talks about his new book, A Life Coloured In, an exuberant memoir by one of Australia's best-loved artists. Ken Done has an extraordinary place in the hearts of Australians - many of whom have worn or decorated homes with his artwork. Taylor Swift was given a specially commissioned Ken Done artwork to commemorate her December 2015 Australian tour. Done donated his fee to UNICEF Australia, for which he is a Goodwill Ambassador. Done's vivid, optimistic images are part of our collective consciousness and have helped define Australia to the world. But what do we know about the man behind the brush and the 'Ken Done' commercial art phenomenon? The sudden loss of his investments from a lifetime's hard work and a resultant stressful court case was closely followed by a shock cancer diagnosis. It was a dark time, but the powerful paintings that subsequently emerged have brought him long-overdue artistic acclaim. Ken Done was awarded the Order of Australia (AM) in 1992 and was named Aus

  • The cyber security challenges posed by Generations Y and Z
    The cyber security challenges posed by Generations Y and Z
    Duration: 42min | 02/05/2016

    This presentation looks at the unique characteristics of Generations Y and Z, and the implications of these characteristics for society and organisational security. The presentation also looks at the role of these two generations in terrorist groups. Professor Clive Williams MG is an Honorary Professor at the ANU Centre for Military Security and Law, and a Visiting Fellow at the ANU Strategic and Defence Studies Centre. He has a career background in intelligence and security.

  • Conversations Across the Creek #2
    Conversations Across the Creek #2
    Duration: 50min | 27/04/2016

    The second in the Conversations Across the Creek series was a lively discussion of the abstract beauty of mathematics, the crisis of too much data, the possibilities of a universal language, and the potentials of machine learning within the constraints of making something which doesn't not work. Also mentioned: hammers, certainty, ethics, and Proust. This session’s speakers were: Professor Anna Wierzbicka (Linguistics, School of Literature, Languages and Linguistics), Dr Glenn Roe (Digital Humanities, Centre for Digital Humanities Research), Professor Bob Williamson (Machine Learning, Research School of Computer Science), and Dr Vanessa Robins (Computational Topology, Research School of Physics & Engineering). Hosted by Director of the Humanities Research Centre Professor Will Christie. The Conversations Across the Creek series is an initiative of the Humanities Research Centre and the Centre for the Public Awareness of Science. ‘Conversations’ seeks to highlight the commonalities and interesting intersect

  • Sarah Ferguson and Lenore Taylor in conversation on The Killing Season: Uncut
    Sarah Ferguson and Lenore Taylor in conversation on 'The Killing Season: Uncut"
    Duration: 56min | 20/04/2016

    Australians came to the ABC's 2015 TV series The Killing Season in their droves, their fascination with the Rudd-Gillard struggle as unfinished as the saga itself. 'The Killing Season: Uncut' takes readers behind the scenes with new on-the-record material and telling insights into the key players of this dramatic period in Australian politics. Sarah Ferguson says "The making of The Killing Season matched the drama on screen and that's a story we wanted to tell. And now we have a place for the episodes of rich material we could have put into a 5-part series." In this conversation Sarah is joined by Lenore Taylor, political editor for the Guardian Australia.

  • Climate, fire and human evolution
    Climate, fire and human evolution
    Duration: 01h08min | 12/04/2016

    This talk was recorded at the launch of Dr Andrew Glikson's and Professor Colin Groves' latest book 'Climate, Fire and Human Evolution: The Deep Time Dimensions of the Anthropocene'. Dr Glikson and Professor Groves were also joined by Professor Will Steffen and Professor Stephen Eggins to explore future climate trends and debate the philosophy of science. 'Climate, Fire and Human Evolution' uses Earth System science to explain pre-historic human evolution, give insight into the origins of the mastery of fire and broaden our understanding of climate change. It outlines principal milestones in the evolution of the atmosphere, oceans and biosphere during the last 4 million years in relation with the evolution of primates to the genus Homo - which uniquely mastered the ignition and transfer of fire.

  • Meet the author event with Stan Grant
    Meet the author event with Stan Grant
    Duration: 33min | 29/02/2016

    Stan Grant discusses his new book, Talking To My Country, a powerful and personal meditation on race, culture and national identity. Talking To My Country is not just about race, or about Indigenous people but all of us, our shared identity. This is his very personal meditation on what it means to be Australian, what it means to be Indigenous, and what racism really means in this country. Stan Grant, a Wiradjuri man, is one of Australia's leading journalists, having worked in Asia, the Middle East, Europe and Africa for the ABC, SBS, and the Seven Network. From 2001 to 2012 he was a CNN anchor in Hong Kong before relocating to Beijing as a correspondent. Since 2013, he has been the International Editor for SKY News. He is also Managing Editor of National Indigenous Television, and the Indigenous Affairs Editor at The Guardian. In 2015, he won a Walkley award for his coverage of Indigenous affairs.

  • Kerry OBrien in conversation with Lenore Taylor
    Kerry O'Brien in conversation with Lenore Taylor
    Duration: 01h14min | 05/11/2015

    Kerry O'Brien joined Lenore Taylor in conversation on 30 October 2015 to discuss his long awaited book, Keating. As there will never be an autobiography nor a memoir from Paul Keating, this book is as good as it gets: funny, sweeping, angry, imaginative, mischievous, with arrogance, a glimmer of humility and more than a touch of creative madness.

  • Background to the Syrian refugee crisis
    Background to the Syrian refugee crisis
    Duration: 46min | 19/10/2015

    This talk looks at Syria’s history since the First World War, the events leading up to the Arab Spring uprising in Syria, the nature of the Syrian conflict since 2011, and the reasons for the current refugee crisis. Clive Williams is a Visiting Professor at the Centre for Military and Security Law at the ANU. He has worked extensively in conflict zones and was last in the Middle East in August 2015.

  • Federalism and Australia’s National Health and Health Insurance System
    Federalism and Australia’s National Health and Health Insurance System
    Duration: 55min | 19/10/2015

    Despite the recent rhetoric about transferring responsibilities back to the States and ensuring each jurisdiction has sovereignty in its own sphere of responsibilities including to raise the revenues needed to meet its spending commitments, reform of the Australian Federation will hopefully take a more pragmatic form, building on the growing demand for national policies - and growing range of international requirements - to guide public services, improving the way in which shared responsibilities are managed, while allowing service delivery to respond to local and regional needs and preferences. Such a pragmatic approach requires a degree of bipartisanship and political leadership at both Commonwealth and State levels; it also entails engaging with the Australian public, promoting steady reform in the national interest and avoiding short-term or ideologically-driven political fixes. About the speaker Professor Andrew Podger AO is an Hon. Professor of Public Policy at ANU. He has been at the University since

  • Will Australia rejoin the world on Climate Change?
    Will Australia rejoin the world on Climate Change?
    Duration: 01h14min | 19/10/2015

    Australia has offered an emissions reduction target for the Paris talks that is significantly below that of the European Union and which even falls short of the United States target. Australia needs to re-engage with the rest of the world, which is increasingly aware of the impact of dangerous climate change. It is simply too urgent to opt out - we need action now. The Rt. Hon John Gummer, Lord Deben, is a former UK Secretary of State for the Environment and is currently the Chairman of the UK’s Climate Change Committee and Special Advisor to the United Nations on Carbon Pricing. His sixteen years of top-level ministerial experience also included Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Minster for London, Employment Minister and Paymaster General in HM Treasury.

  • There is life on Mars, probably (!)
    There is life on Mars, probably (!)
    Duration: 55min | 07/10/2015

    Malcolm Walter, Professor of Astrobiology (retired) at the University of NSW and Founding Director of the Australian Centre for Astrobiology, presents the 2015 The David Cooper Memorial Lecture. In this talk he examines where the best place to look for life on Mars would be and why discovering life on the Red Planet is so important.

  • David Marr in conversation with Laura Tingle
    David Marr in conversation with Laura Tingle
    Duration: 01h02min | 05/10/2015

    David Marr joins Laura Tingle in conversation to discuss his new quarterly essay on Bill Shorten – Faction Man Bill Shorten's Path to Power. David Marr is the nation's leading writer of political biography. His Quarterly Essay profiles of Kevin Rudd and Tony Abbott were national bestsellers. This controversial and brilliant new essay looks at the making of Shorten. It also addresses a key question: how does the union movement for good or ill continue to shape the Labor Party? May contain some brief coarse language.

  • ANU/The Canberra Times meet the author event with Tim Flannery
    ANU/The Canberra Times meet the author event with Tim Flannery
    Duration: 55min | 05/10/2015

    Ten years after his internationally bestselling The Weather Makers, acclaimed scientist and author Tim Flannery argues that Earth's climate system is approaching a crisis. Catastrophe is not inevitable, but time is fast running out. In the lead-up to the United Nations Climate Change Summit to be held in Paris in December, Atmosphere of Hope provides both a snapshot of the trouble we are in and an up-to-the-minute analysis of some of the new possibilities for mitigating climate change that are emerging now.

  • ANU/The Canberra Times meet the author event with Andrew Leigh
    ANU/The Canberra Times meet the author event with Andrew Leigh
    Duration: 54min | 14/09/2015

    In The Luck of Politics, The Hon Dr Andrew Leigh MP weaves together numbers and stories to show the many ways luck can change the course of political events.This is a book full of fascinating facts and intriguing findings. Why is politics more like poker than chess? Does the length of your surname affect your political prospects? What about your gender? The Hon Dr Andrew Leigh MP is the Shadow Assistant Treasurer and Federal Member for Fraser in the ACT. Prior to being elected in 2010, Andrew was a professor of economics at The Australian National University.

  • Dr Neil deGrasse Tyson and Professor Brian Schmidt in conversation
    Dr Neil deGrasse Tyson and Professor Brian Schmidt in conversation
    Duration: 17min | 14/09/2015

    When Dr Neil deGrasse Tyson was on campus last month he sat down for a conversation with Nobel laureate Professor Brian Schmidt to discuss the importance of science, the democratisation of space and the possibility of alien life.

  • ANU/The Canberra Times meet the author event with Chris Bowen
    ANU/The Canberra Times meet the author event with Chris Bowen
    Duration: 56min | 14/09/2015

    Chris Bowen speaks about his latest book 'The Money Men' an in-depth look at the twelve most notable and interesting men to have held the office of Treasurer of Australia. This talk brings a unique insider perspective to the lessons learned from the successes and failures of those who went before him. The Hon Chris Bowen was appointed Treasurer by Kevin Rudd in 2013 and is the current Shadow Treasurer.

  • Climate Change: implications for Australia and the world
    Climate Change: implications for Australia and the world
    Duration: 01h19min | 20/08/2015

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report is the world's most comprehensive evaluation of climate change, its potential impacts and the choices we have for responding to it. The report provides leaders with a scientific basis for developing strategies to address climate change. Most importantly, it will be the leading scientific document to inform negotiations at the Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC (COP 21) in December 2015, at which negotiators will try to reach a global climate agreement. Whilst the report finds that human influence on the climate system is clear, we do have the means to limit climate change and build a more prosperous, sustainable future. Speakers: Professor Jean-Pascal van Ypersele, IPCC Vice-Chair: Overview of the Fifth Assessment Report Dr Youba Sokona, IPCC Co Chair Working Group III: Mitigation of Climate Change Dr Andy Reisinger, IPCC Lead Author: Climate Change Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability: focus on Australia Dr Debra Rob

  • Professor Sir Richard Evans: Meet the historian
    Professor Sir Richard Evans: Meet the historian
    Duration: 01h12min | 30/07/2015

    Professor Sir Richard Evans talks about German history and his advice for budding historians. Sir Richard Evans is Regius Professor Emeritus of History and President of Wolfson College, University of Cambridge, and Provost of Gresham College, London. His publications include Altered Pasts: Counterfactuals in History; The Coming of the Third Reich; The Third Reich in Power; The Third Reich at War; Telling Lies about Hitler and In Defence of History.

  • How dangerous is it to live in a Mr Fluffy house?
    How dangerous is it to live in a Mr Fluffy house?
    Duration: 01h08min | 30/07/2015

    On average, people who live, or have lived, in a Mr Fluffy house probably have higher exposure to asbestos than other Australians. How much this higher exposure increases their risk of asbestos-related disease is uncertain. There is very limited evidence on the level of asbestos exposure in Mr Fluffy houses. Most of the evidence on the health effects of asbestos comes from studies of people heavily exposed to asbestos in their workplace; and extrapolating from effects at high levels of exposure to effects at low levels requires uncertain assumptions. In this lecture, Professor Bruce Armstrong reviews background evidence on health effects of asbestos and their importance in Australia, discuss what is known of the frequency of these effects at low levels of exposure, make an estimate of the risk of mesothelioma to people who live or have lived in a Mr Fluffy house, and briefly describe research currently being done to permit more certain estimates.

  • Smoking and mortality: the first large-scale Australian results
    Smoking and mortality: the first large-scale Australian results
    Duration: 38min | 30/07/2015

    Australia is a world leader in tobacco control and currently has one of the lowest rates of smoking in the world. Reliable quantitative evidence on the relationship of tobacco smoking to mortality in Australia has not been previously available, and has the potential to contribute to what is known internationally about the contemporary risks of smoking. Professor Emily Banks presents data on the smoking epidemic, and its health consequences, internationally. It will provide details of a large-scale prospective cohort study involving 204,953 individuals aged 45 years and over from the general population of New South Wales: the 45 and Up Study. This study found that current smokers were three times more likely to die during the 4 year follow-up period than people who had never smoked. Smokers are estimated to die an average of 10 years earlier than non-smokers and up to two-thirds of deaths in current smokers can be attributed to smoking. These findings show that the harms of smoking in Australia, and the bene

  • How to solve the inequality problem that is plaguing capitalism
    How to solve the inequality problem that is plaguing capitalism
    Duration: 01h04min | 30/07/2015

    The specter of massive inequality is haunting modern capitalism, with a small elite – the 1%, 0.01%, 0.001% of billionaires and financiers and the like – gaining the bulk of the benefits of modern economic growth and using their wealth to dominate economies and politics. In virtually every country, labor's share of income has fallen and inequality has increased massively. What, if anything, can we do to restore a more egalitarian distribution of income, with a strong middle class, and restore the historic link between growth of productivity and real wages? This talk argues that the answer lies in wider ownership of capital and worker participation in decisions at their workplace and firm. It gives the evidence that this solution works and lays out ways to get from here to there. Richard B. Freeman holds the Herbert Ascherman Chair in Economics at Harvard University and is currently Faculty co-Director of the Labor and Worklife Program at the Harvard Law School. He directs the National Bureau of Economic Rese

  • ANU/The Canberra Times meet the author event with Frank Brennan
    ANU/The Canberra Times meet the author event with Frank Brennan
    Duration: 57min | 23/07/2015

    From one of the leading thinkers of our time comes a landmark book on the case for constitutional reform - No Small Change: The Road to Recognition for Indigenous Australia by Frank Brennan. This timely book is a stark reminder of the tainted relationship between successive governments, lawmen and Indigenous Australians, but also a provocative lesson on what we can learn from the past. Brennan unpacks the laws and philosophies from terra nullius, protectionism and forced assimilation to the 1967 referendum, land rights, self-determination and beyond. Rigorous, accessible, and insightful, No Small Change is a profound document that has the power to change our nation's future. Frank Brennan is a Jesuit priest, professor of law at the Australian Catholic University, and adjunct professor at the ANU College of Law and the ANU National Centre for Indigenous Studies. Professor Brennan has been actively committed to Indigenous reconciliation, justice and recognition for over 30 years.

  • Migration and security: rhetoric and reality
    Migration and security: rhetoric and reality
    Duration: 01h03min | 03/07/2015

    Along with the increase in focus on the need for policymakers and the community to implement and support initiatives on countering violent extremism, there has been a tendency to put migration high on the agenda too. The phenomenon of foreign fighters in Iraq and Syria – small in number but significant in political impact – is at risk of dominating the migration and security discussion. Recent events in Australia and Europe are causing some to reflect on the apparent failures of integration that have radicalised some immigrants and their descendants. There may be some who are drawing a line uncritically between irregular migration, asylum and the risk of importing terrorism. Each of the links between migration and violent extremism is relevant and needs to be understood and confronted; but to cast migration as only a negative influence would be erroneous. In this talk, Dr Koser will outline key aspects of the broader migration and security discussion and how it is changing as well as discuss some ideas abo

  • The atmosphere: past, present and future
    The atmosphere: past, present and future
    Duration: 58min | 26/06/2015

    Are we headed for a geological event horizon? Dr Andrew Glikson explains how the rise of atmospheric greenhouse gases of 2-3 parts per million CO2 per year has reached an order of magnitude similar to rates associated with mass extinctions of species. Dr Andrew Glikson, an Earth and paleo-climate scientist, graduated from the University of Western Australia. He has conducted geological surveys of the oldest geological formations in Australia, South Africa, India and Canada, studied large asteroid impacts, including effects on the atmosphere, the oceans and the mass extinction of species.

  • ANU/The Canberra Times meet the author event with Michael Cooney - The Gillard Project
    ANU/The Canberra Times meet the author event with Michael Cooney - The Gillard Project
    Duration: 53min | 01/06/2015

    Michael Cooney was Julia Gillard's speechwriter for most of her time in office. He came to the job a true believer in every sense, with years of Labor experience behind him, including Policy Director to Federal Labor leaders Kim Beazley and Mark Latham. But this was the prime minister's office. The stakes were high and the game had changed. From mining to the economy to Afghanistan, Cooney wrote the speeches that helped to define the Gillard project: the prime minister's program and vision for the country. He was there at the coalface of decisions on the carbon 'tax' and the budget surplus; in the lead-up to the 'misogyny' speech and the 'we are us' Labor conference speech. He cried and laughed and swore as Australia's first female prime minister got through a record number of pieces of legislation in the time she had. This is his story, and hers.

  • ANU/The Canberra Times meet the author event with Xue Xinran
    ANU/The Canberra Times meet the author event with Xue Xinran
    Duration: 01h02min | 28/05/2015

    One in five of the world's population is Chinese, 300 million Chinese are under 30, and of these, most are only children as a result of the One Child Policy. What do these only children think and do? A generation burdened with high expectation and unprepared for responsibility. With journalistic acumen and a novelist's flair, Xinran tells the remarkable stories of men and women born and raised under China's single-child policy. Xinran shows how these generations embody the hopes and fears of a great nation at a time of unprecedented change. Buy Me the Sky provides an illuminating glimpse of the face of modern China.

  • Rethinking the nature of prejudice
    Rethinking the nature of prejudice
    Duration: 58min | 25/05/2015

    In this talk Professor John C Turner, from the School of Psychology at The Australian National University, poses the basic question, "what is the nature of "prejudice"?

  • Stand  Deliver: Celebrating 50 years of the National Press Club
    Stand & Deliver: Celebrating 50 years of the National Press Club
    Duration: 58min | 06/05/2015

    If Australian politics and public policy debates are a war of ideas, the National Press Club (NPC) is the battleground. For the past half-century, the NPC has been the epicentre of political and social debate in Australia. Leaders and opinion-makers have used its stage to launch leadership bids, rattle the cage of public opinion with courageous and sometimes outrageous ideas, and make a stand. Stand & Deliver author Steve Lewis joins political historian Frank Bongiorno in conversation to discuss some of the NPC's most powerful, controversial and entertaining speeches of the past fifty years. Steve Lewis has been reporting politics in Canberra since 1992 and has survived the near collapse of the Fairfax media group, three prime ministers, Mark Latham and a career switch from The Financial Review to the News Ltd tabloids. Steve now writes freelance and works for Newgate Communications. Associate Professor Frank Bongiorno is an Australian labour, political and cultural historian who teaches at the ANU.

  • South China Sea Maritime dispute: political, legal  regional perspectives
    South China Sea Maritime dispute: political, legal & regional perspectives
    Duration: 01h29min | 06/05/2015

    The South China Sea is a major strategic waterway for trade and energy shipments to Asia’s major economies. It has been the focus of maritime disputes which have continued for more than six decades, with competing claims from China, Vietnam, the Philippines and others. In recent years, growing Chinese assertiveness in pressing its claims has unsettled the regional security order, drawing the attention of the United States, Australia and other powers concerned about freedom of navigation and a rules-based order. The springboard for this discussion is the recently published book, edited by Leszek Buszynski and Christopher Roberts, which examines the South China Sea as an ongoing maritime dispute which has become a potential conflict zone. This volume is the final outcome of a National Security College collaborative research project, which involved a number of present and former academic staff from both the College and the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre at ANU. The book examines the conflict potential of

  • Kate Grenville in conversation with Marion Halligan
    Kate Grenville in conversation with Marion Halligan
    Duration: 58min | 16/04/2015

    When Kate Grenville’s mother, Nance Russell, died she left behind many fragments of memoir. These were the starting point for One Life, the story of a woman whose life spanned a century of tumult and change. Nance’s story reflects the changing patterns of the twentieth century which offered a path to new freedoms and choices. One Life is an act of great imaginative sympathy, a deeply moving homage to her mother by one of Australia’s finest writers. It provides an illuminating window into Australia’s social history, including attitudes to Aborigines, the role of women and the impact of politics and class. “Evocative and fascinating, this brave and heartfelt tribute will appeal to anyone interested in their own family story, Australian history, or the lives of women”. Joanne Shields, Australian Books and Publishing. Kate Grenville is one of Australia’s most celebrated writers. Her bestselling novel The Secret River received the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and the

  • Why China will not become the dominant power in Asia
    Why China will not become the dominant power in Asia
    Duration: 01h12min | 14/04/2015

    The belief that China will soon become the dominant power in Asia is based on assumptions that its continued and rapid economic rise, and its emergence as a regional peer of America’s in military terms is all but assured. Such a belief underpins arguments that a fundamental strategic reorganisation of Asia is inevitable, and that it will be necessary and perhaps even desirable to concede to China significant ‘strategic space’. Dependent largely on linear extrapolations about the future, such arguments ignore the implications of China’s economic, social and national fragilities, its lack of major friends or allies in the region as well as the considerable military deficiencies and challenges faced by the People’s Liberation Army. With the Defence White Paper due for release in 2015, the government should bear in mind that planning for an era of Chinese dominance in the region—or even its emergence as an American strategic peer in Asia—would be premature if not improbable. Australia should not design its defenc

  • Anna Bligh in conversation with The Hon Tanya Plibersek MP
    Anna Bligh in conversation with The Hon Tanya Plibersek MP
    Duration: 01h01min | 01/04/2015

    ANU/Canberra Times meet the author event with Anna Bligh in conversation with The Hon Tanya Plibersek MP Anna Bligh knows something about hard knocks and high walls. She was raised by a single mother in the working class Gold Coast, a young girl with a soon-to-be-estranged dad who struggled with alcoholism. She spent over 17 years in the rough and tumble of the Queensland Parliament (seven of them as either Deputy Premier or Premier). In 2011, she led Queensland through the devastation of Australia's largest natural disasters. Her Party then lost the 2012 State election and Anna stepped down to start a new life, only to find herself diagnosed with cancer. Writing with her trademark honesty, warmth and humour about the challenges that public and private life have thrown her, Anna reflects candidly - as a wife, mother, daughter, friend and political leader - on the lessons of leadership, resilience, community and family. Anna Bligh became Deputy Premier of Queensland in 2005 and Premier in 2007. In March

  • One Health and superbugs: The ever growing threat from foods and water
    One Health and superbugs: The ever growing threat from foods and water
    Duration: 46min | 01/04/2015

    Antibiotic resistance is rapidly rising internationally. Many bacterial infections are now very difficult, and sometimes impossible, to treat. Gram negative bacteria are the pointy end of this growing problem, including very common bacteria such as E. Coli. Antibiotic resistance is proportional to use. The more antibiotics used, the more resistance develops and spreads. This is both in individuals (e.g. with the pneumonia bacteria - pneumococcus) and for populations in different countries. Decreasing the total amounts of antimicrobial used in people and agriculture, decreasing corruption in countries around the world, adopting a One Health approach and ensuring people and food animals have access to “safe” water will all make major contributions to controlling antimicrobial resistance. Presented by Professor Peter Collignon AM. Exec Director, ACT Pathology. Infectious Diseases Physician and Microbiologist, Canberra Hospital. Professor, ANU Medical School.

  • Towards a new Australian security
    Towards a new Australian security
    Duration: 38min | 24/03/2015

    The incoming Head of the ANU National Security College, Professor Rory Medcalf, offers some assessments on the long-term policy choices Australians and their governments will need to make to advance their country’s security interests in the uncertain decades ahead. Professor Rory Medcalf commenced as the Head of the National Security College in January 2015. His professional background spans diplomacy, intelligence analysis, think tanks and journalism. Most recently he was the Director of the International Security Program at the Lowy Institute for International Policy from 2007 to 2015.

  • 2015 S T Lee Lecture with His Excellency Xanana Gusmão
    2015 S T Lee Lecture with His Excellency Xanana Gusmão
    Duration: 40min | 23/03/2015

    His Excellency Kay Rala Xanana Gusmão is the Minister of Planning and Strategic Investment for the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste. He has served as President of his country for five years, Prime Minister for seven and a half years and was a central figure in his country’s 24-year struggle for the restoration of independence. In this public address he discussed Political Transition and National Unity: The Timor-Leste Story, exploring the lessons of nation building and transition in Australia’s ‘near neighbor to the north’. He reflected on the ways Timor-Leste’s experience relates to international experience and present his views on how emerging global trends are impacting developing nations and fragile States. His Excellency Kay Rala Xanana Gusmão is the Minister of Planning and Strategic Investment of the Government of Timor-Leste. Until stepping aside in February 2015 to facilitate a generational leadership transition, he was the Prime Minister of his country for seven and a half years. Prior to this r

  • David Malouf in conversation with Gerard Vaughan
    David Malouf in conversation with Gerard Vaughan
    Duration: 01h01min | 03/03/2015

    Internationally acclaimed author David Malouf joins Gerard Vaughan AM in conversation for a discussion featuring art, literature and music. After exploring the idea of home, where and what it is in A First Place, what does it mean to be a writer and where writing begins in The Writing Life, David Malouf moves on to words, music, art and performance in Being There. With pieces on the Sydney Opera House - then and now - responses to art, artists and architects, and including Malouf’s previously unpublished libretti for Voss and a translation of Hippolytus, this is an unmissable and stimulating collection of one man’s connection to the world of art, ideas and culture. David Malouf’s Collected Stories won the 2008 Australia-Asia Literary Award and his most recent books are A First Place and The Writing Life. Dr Gerard Vaughan AM is the Director of the National Gallery of Australia, a position he has held since November 2014.

  • The Middle East: Is the ‘Islamic State’ vanquishable?
    The Middle East: Is the ‘Islamic State’ vanquishable?
    Duration: 39min | 05/02/2015

    The rise of the so-called Islamic State (IS) on vast swathes of territories in Syria and Iraq, and the US-led military response to it, have introduced another complex dimension to an oil-rich but already very volatile Middle East. The old correlation of forces in support of maintaining the status quo, especially following the Iranian revolution more than 35 years ago, has been changing. A set of new alignments and realignments along multiple regional fault-lines, including sectarian divisions and geopolitical rivalries at different levels, has come to redefine the region and possibly change its traditional political and territorial contours. IS has confronted all the regional states, from the Islamic Republic of Iran to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, with a common enemy. Yet, it is the United States and its Western allies that have taken the lead in launching a military intervention to ‘degrade and eliminate’ IS, despite lacking a laudable past record in this respect. This raises a number of questions. Should

  • When does science matter?
    When does science matter?
    Duration: 02h33min | 15/01/2015

    Science has evolved over thousands of years of human enquiry to provide a rational basis for understanding and predicting what happens in the world around us. We rely on science to enhance our standard of living, to keep us healthy and to address the problems and challenges that we face. Science has put men on the moon, probed distant planets, discovered DNA and cured disease. And yet, there are many who still question the value and legitimacy of science which raises the question: when and why does science matter? Four of the world’s most eminent scientists come together at ANU for one night only to discuss and deliberate on the biggest challenges facing the science community today. If you don’t think science matters to you, you may think again. Professor Steven Chu was the co-recipient of the 1997 Nobel Prize for Physics. He has devoted his recent scientific career to the search for new solutions to our energy and climate challenges. In December 2008 Dr Chu was selected by then President-elect Barack

  • Blow Up The Lecture: Part 3
    Blow Up The Lecture: Part 3
    Duration: 01h26min | 09/01/2015

    In today’s classrooms academics and teachers are increasingly expected to incorporate new communication technologies into their curriculum. However, by adopting these new mediums are we reducing the quality of students’ educational experience or is this just the way of the classrooms of tomorrow? In the final ‘blow up the lecture’ event for the year, our panel of experts examine the future of education in an online world addressing questions such as: What digital resources can we harness to enhance our massive open online courses (MOOCs)? Are there any resources that need rapid development? What is our single most relevant hurdle to fully harnessing digital education What are the key target populations for ANU in online learning? What do you think are the measures of success for MOOCs? Armando Fox is a professor in Berkeley's Electrical Engineering & Computer Science Department and the Faculty Advisor to the UC Berkeley MOOCLab. With his colleague David Patterson, he co-designed and co-taught Berkeley's f

  • Solar energy in a sustainable world
    Solar energy in a sustainable world
    Duration: 01h17min | 08/01/2015

    Professor Steven Chu gives the plenary opening at the Light, Energy and the Environment Congress held on 5 December 2014.

  • The Annual ANU Reconciliation Lecture: Is Australia big enough for reconciliation?
    The Annual ANU Reconciliation Lecture: Is Australia big enough for reconciliation?
    Duration: 32min | 03/12/2014

    The Australian community has, to an unprecedented extent, become involved in reconciliation through Reconciliation Action Plans and other initiatives. There is acceptance that there is a broad responsibility beyond governments to help close the gap. At the same time we have sharpened political and government focus with a Prime Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, massive reorganisation of how the Commonwealth goes about its business, and all-party support for Constitutional recognition. In these respects, it can be said to be the best of times. But the wide community support this suggests is support for equality, that we all become the same in a social and economic sense. Reconciliation is about more than equality. It involves recognition of the possibility of continuing difference as well. The continuing place of the world's oldest living cultures is still unfinished business. Reconciliation here requires more than the legally mandated post-Mabo requirement to deal with the Aboriginal native title collectives id

  • Academia and public policy - The case of the National Security College
    Academia and public policy - The case of the National Security College
    Duration: 48min | 13/11/2014

    In his valedictory address, outgoing Head of College Professor Michael L'Estrange argues that the NSC is a good example of how the worlds of public policy and academia can best work together.

  • 2014 ANU Last Lecture: Can we live without Classics?
    2014 ANU Last Lecture: Can we live without Classics?
    Duration: 53min | 06/11/2014

    In this podcast ANU classics expert Dr Ioannis Ziogas delivers the 2014 Last Lecture. Classics, the study of the ancient Greek and Roman world, deals with the traditional literature of Greece and Rome and the themes of history, philosophy, and culture. Dr Ziogas says it makes it a multi-faceted and diverse subject for students to learn, especially since the topic is always on the news and in movies. “It actually covers a lot of motifs that are appealing to this young age group – the coming of age, the challenges within families, discovering yourself – all these lie at the heart of Greek myth and all these issues appeal to the young students.” The Last Lecture is an initiative supported by the Dean of Students, the ANU Students' Association (ANUSA) and the Postgraduate and Research Students' Association (PARSA). Around 1,200 students voted in the Last Lecture process. They chose from 100 lecturers who made it through to final nominations.

  • ANU/Canberra Times meet the author event with Hugh Mackay
    ANU/Canberra Times meet the author event with Hugh Mackay
    Duration: 57min | 05/11/2014

    This talk was given at The Australian National University on 22 October 2014. The Art of Belonging advances the argument put forward in Mackay's bestselling The Good Life: a 'good life' is not lived in isolation or in the pursuit of independent goals; a good life is lived at the heart of a thriving community, among people we trust, and within an environment of mutual respect. Drawing on 50 years' experience as a social researcher, Mackay creates a fictional suburb, Southwood, and populates it with characters who - like most of us - struggle to reconcile their need to belong with their desire to live life on their own terms. He chronicles the numerous human interactions and inevitable conflicts that arise in a community when characters assert their own needs at the expense of others. The Art of Belonging is the book that will reignite the conversation about how we want to live; it will provide the framework for those who argue for a particular vision of community, one that sustains, protects and nurtures th

  • Discovering a lost forest giant - 31 years of science in worlds tallest forests
    Discovering a lost forest giant - 31 years of science in world's tallest forests
    Duration: 55min | 05/11/2014

    The 2014 OAA-ANU Lecture The world’s tallest flowering plants – the Mountain Ash forests – lie just 90 minutes’ drive north-east from the Melbourne Cricket Ground. They are the world’s most carbon dense ecosystems. They yield almost all of Melbourne’s water supply and are a critical environment for a wide range of native plants and animals. Mountain Ash forests are also subject to widespread logging, primarily for paper production and were the scene of the 2009 Black Saturday wildfires – the worst natural disaster in Australian history. The ANU has conducted key research programs on forest ecology, biodiversity conservation and disturbance (logging and fire) impacts in these forests since mid-1983 leading to a major body of new knowledge and an array of exciting scientific discoveries. In this lecture Professor David Lindenmayer summarises some of the extra-ordinary ecology of Mountain Ash forests and some sobering recent research results highlighting links between past logging operations and the elevated

  • Why it is so difficult to resolve peacefully intractable conflicts
    Why it is so difficult to resolve peacefully intractable conflicts
    Duration: 01h19min | 03/11/2014

    One of the major questions raised regarding many protracted and violent intergroup conflicts is why the adversaries do not succeed in reaching a settlement that seems obvious and easily attainable to outsiders. This question is of special importance because despite great losses, destruction, and personal suffering, many members of societies engulfed in these conflicts remain entrenched in their conflict supporting narratives that prevent peace making process and cannot go easily through a societal change that is required in order to achieve peaceful settlement of the conflict. These conflict-supporting narratives are propagated over many years by various channels of communication and various institutions in each involved society, including the educational system. They become pillars of culture of conflict and leaders with the help of the societal institutions make all the efforts to maintain them. Various societal mechanisms are employed to prevent transmission and dissemination of alternative information tha

  • How natural is justice? an Ombudsmans perspective
    How natural is justice? an Ombudsman's perspective
    Duration: 48min | 27/10/2014

    Seventeenth Geoffrey Sawer Lecture 2014 Geoffrey Sawer was the first Professor of Law at The Australian National University, appointed in 1950 at the age of 40. His fluid and incisive writing, especially on Australian constitutional law and politics, has had a significant impact on succeeding generations of academics, practitioners and judges. In 1998, two years after Sawer’s death in 1996, in honour of this pioneering scholar, the Dean of the ANU College of Law, Michael Coper, with then Centre for International and Public Law Director Hilary Charlesworth, inaugurated the annual Sawer Lecture. Since then, the annual lecture has been delivered by such luminaries as Sir Ninian Stephen, Sir Gerard Brennan, and Professor Leslie Zines. Ms Deborah Glass OBE is the current Victorian Ombudsman. She was appointed in March 2014; the appointment is for a term of 10 years. Deborah has recently stepped down as Deputy Chair of the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) of England and Wales, completing a 10-year

  • Does Australia need new anti-terror laws?
    Does Australia need new anti-terror laws?
    Duration: 50min | 27/10/2014

    After enacting an array of new anti-terror laws in the years following the September 11 attacks, Australia is now seeking to introduce additional laws in response to the threat posed by fighters returning from conflicts in Syria and Iraq. This talk will examine whether these measures are needed, exploring whether Australia already has the laws in place to protect the community from home-grown terrorism? Drawing from current examples, Professor George Williams will consider if changes need to be made. This includes such measures as the collection of metadata on calls and internet use, reversing the onus of proof by deeming a person guilty of an offence if they travel to certain locations, and making it easier for government to ban organisations (and jail their members) based on their speech about terrorism. George Williams AO is the Anthony Mason Professor at the University of New South Wales. As an Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow, Professor Williams is engaged in a multi-year project on ant

  • ANU/Canberra Times meet the author event with Graeme Simsion
    ANU/Canberra Times meet the author event with Graeme Simsion
    Duration: 58min | 14/10/2014

    Graeme Simsion talks about his latest book, creative processes and adapting the Rosie Project for the big screen. The Rosie Project was an international publishing phenomenon, with more than a million copies sold in over forty countries around the world. Now Graeme Simsion returns with the highly anticipated sequel, The Rosie Effect. Don Tillman and Rosie Jarman are now married and living in New York. Just as Don is about to announce that Gene, his philandering best friend from Australia, is coming to stay, Rosie drops a bombshell: she’s pregnant. In true Tillman style, Don instantly becomes an expert on all things obstetric. But in between immersing himself in a new research study on parenting and implementing the Standardised Meal System (pregnancy version), Don’s old weaknesses resurface. And while he strives to get the technicalities right, he gets the emotions all wrong, and risks losing Rosie when she needs him most. Graeme Simsion was born in Auckland and is a Melbourne-based writer of short stori

  • Crafting democracies: Learning from political leaders to shape the future
    Crafting democracies: Learning from political leaders to shape the future
    Duration: 01h13min | 14/10/2014

    Authoritarian regimes are under siege in many parts of the world. Some have already given way and others are likely to follow. Building democracies in their place will not be easy or quick, and in some cases it will not happen in the medium term. Much has been learned about how to organize free and fair elections, but building the other institutions and the habits of democratic governance inevitably takes time. Some countries in transition face intense divisions that make democracy challenging to achieve. But the historic possibility of decisive movement from exclusionary and repressive rule toward more open, inclusionary and accountable democratic governance beckons in North and sub-Saharan Africa, Western Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Caribbean. Learning how unexpected transitions toward democracy were accomplished should be of great interest to those who want to understand, undertake or support democratic transitions today. Abraham F. (Abe) Lowenthal has combined two careers: as an analyst of Latin Americ

  • ANU/Canberra Times meet the author event: The Official History of ASIO 1949-1963
    ANU/Canberra Times meet the author event: The Official History of ASIO 1949-1963
    Duration: 40min | 14/10/2014

    With unprecedented access to their hitherto sealed records, David Horner tells the real story of Australia's domestic intelligence organisation, from shaky beginnings to the expulsion of Ivan Skripov in 1963. This is the first volume of a remarkable official history of ASIO - a revealing and authoritative account of the early years of Australia's national security intelligence service. With unfettered access to the records, David Horner’s research sheds new light on the Petrov Affair, and documents incidents and activities that have never previously been revealed. This authoritative and ground-breaking account overturns many myths about ASIO, and offers new insights into broader Australian politics and society in the fraught years of the Cold War. David Horner AM is Professor of Australian defence history in the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre at The Australian National University, Australia’s oldest, largest and highest ranking academic institute for strategic studies research, education and commentar

  • ANU/Canberra Times meet the author event with Annabel Crabb
    ANU/Canberra Times meet the author event with Annabel Crabb
    Duration: 53min | 08/10/2014

    This podcast was recorded at ANU on Thursday 3 October. Annabel Crabb is in conversation with Samantha Maiden, National Political Editor Sunday Telegraph. Working women are in an advanced, sustained, and chronically under-reported state of wife drought, and there is no sign of rain. But why is the work-and-family debate always about women? Why don't men get the same flexibility that women do? In our fixation on the barriers that face women on the way into the workplace, do we forget about the barriers that – for men – still block the exits? The Wife Drought is about women, men, family and work. Written in Annabel Crabb's inimitable style, it's full of candid and funny stories from the author's work in and around politics and the media, historical nuggets about the role of ‘The Wife' in Australia, and intriguing research about the attitudes that pulse beneath the surface of egalitarian Australia. One of Australia's most popular political commentators, Annabel Crabb is the ABC's chief online political write

  • Australias Antarctic strategic interests in the 21st century
    Australia's Antarctic strategic interests in the 21st century
    Duration: 01h08min | 07/10/2014

    Australia asserts sovereignty to 42 per cent of the Antarctic continent and has a long involvement in Antarctic exploration and science. Australia also has important economic and environmental interests in the Great Southern Ocean. We are an original signatory to the Antarctic Treaty which, among other things, establishes all that part of the globe below 60 degrees South as a region free of military conflict and nuclear arms. While Australia has been a leading player in Antarctic affairs for more than a century, Australian leadership should not be taken for granted as new countries emerge as significant participants in the Antarctic treaty System. This NSC public seminar will explore the emerging issues in Antarctica and their implications for the Antarctic Treaty System and for Australia’s Antarctic policy. Dr Tony Press is the Chief Investigator for the Australian Government’s 20 Year Australian Antarctic Strategic Plan and Adjunct Professor at the University of Tasmania. Until July this year, he was the

  • 13th annual ANU Archives lecture: The Real War? Battles on the Australian home front 1914–19
    13th annual ANU Archives lecture: The Real War? Battles on the Australian home front 1914–19
    Duration: 49min | 07/10/2014

    In the past decade more than 150 books with ‘Anzacs’ in the title have been published. But for Australians there was much more WWI than battles and fighting. The war bitterly divided Australian society and politics, along fault lines that would last for at least a generation. In all of today’s national commemoration we should remember these others ‘wars’—between pro and anti-conscriptionists, between ‘loyalists’ and those whom they stigmatised as ‘disloyal’, and between the labour movement and an increasingly authoritarian government. Within the labour movement, too, there was a war which tore it asunder, in ways that stalled its emergence as a party of reforming government at the national level. Professor Joan Beaumont is an internationally recognised historian of Australia in the two world wars. Her most recent book Broken Nation: Australians and the Great War (Allen & Unwin, 2013) has been shortlisted for the WA Premier’s Award (non-fiction) and the NSW Premier’s (Australian History) Award.

  • Defence policy: whats wrong, and how to fix it
    Defence policy: what's wrong, and how to fix it
    Duration: 43min | 07/10/2014

    The Government’s decision to commission a new Defence White Paper – the third in just in just five years – suggests that Australian defence policy is in trouble. That comes as no surprise, because Defence policy is never easy. But the new White Paper will only fix the problems if we understand why the last two failed, and avoid the same mistakes. Professor Hugh White AO, ANU Public Policy Fellow delivered a keynote address during ANU Public Policy Week 2014.

  • In conversation with author Amy Tan: The Valley of Amazement
    In conversation with author Amy Tan: The Valley of Amazement
    Duration: 01h27s | 24/09/2014

    Born in the United States to immigrant Chinese parents, Amy Tan is an internationally celebrated writer. Her novels The Joy Luck Club, The Kitchen God’s Wife, The Hundred Secret Senses, The Bonesetters Daughter, and Saving Fish from Drowning, are all New York Times bestsellers. She is also the author of a memoir, The Opposite of Fate, and two children's books. Her work has been translated into 35 languages. Join Amy Tan and Colin Steele, Emeritus Fellow, ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences as they discuss the collapse of China’s imperial dynasty to the inner workings of courtesan houses in her new novel Valley of Amazement. With her characteristic wisdom, grace, and humour, Amy Tan conjures a story of the inheritance of love, its mysteries and senses, and its illusions and truths.

  • Reforming Australia’s financial sector in a G-20 world
    Reforming Australia’s financial sector in a G-20 world
    Duration: 02h40min | 24/09/2014

    Alastair Walton, Chairman of BKK Partners and a former Co-Chairman of Goldman Sachs Australia, discusses Australia’s financial sector in the context of global developments impacting the industry.

  • Are most positive findings in psychology false or exaggerated? An activists perspective
    Are most positive findings in psychology false or exaggerated? An activist's perspective
    Duration: 01h10min | 22/09/2014

    Visiting international academic and influential science blogger Professor Jim Coyne gives a provocative talk at ANU Research School of Psychology.

  • ANU/Canberra Times meet the author event with Greg Combet
    ANU/Canberra Times meet the author event with Greg Combet
    Duration: 53min | 04/09/2014

    Greg Combet has been central to some of the biggest public struggles of our time—on the waterfront, the collapse of an airline, compensation for asbestos victims, the campaign against unfair workplace laws and then climate change. From an idyllic childhood on the Minchinbury estate in the western suburbs of Sydney, Combet's world changed dramatically with the early death of his wine-maker father. The shy child was uprooted to the suburbs and an uncertain future. A scholarship allowed him to study engineering and saw him appreciate first hand the role of unions in the workplace. He rose to lead the Australian trade union movement and become a senior minister in the Rudd and Gillard Labor governments. Along the way he has battled his own struggles, with political ideology, the impact of work on families and the loneliness of the parliamentary life. His story is not just a personal memoir; it is an insight into how power works in Australia, who holds it, how it is used and the ruthless ways in which it is snatc

  • Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Executive Director of UN Women, in conversation with Virginia Haussegger
    Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Executive Director of UN Women, in conversation with Virginia Haussegger
    Duration: 01h09min | 28/08/2014

    Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Executive Director of UN Women, in conversation with Virginia Haussegger

  • Why do we not have a vaccine against HIV or TB?
    Why do we not have a vaccine against HIV or TB?
    Duration: 01h14min | 27/08/2014

    The Curtin Medalist for Excellence in Medical Research for 2013, Canberra’s Centenary Year, is Nobel Laureate Emeritus Professor Rolf Zinkernagel. The Medal was presented to Professor Zinkernagel for a Lifetime of Achievement at a ceremony at JCSMR. Professor Zinkernagel then presented a Public Lecture on his work entitled 'Why do we not have a vaccine against HIV or TB?' Professor Zinkernagel was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1996 for his research, carried out in conjunction with Professor Peter Doherty at The John Curtin School in the 1970s. The Prize was for their discoveries concerning the specificity of the cell mediated immune defence.

  • The Hon. Michael Kirby on Human Rights in North Korea
    The Hon. Michael Kirby on Human Rights in North Korea
    Duration: 01h01min | 26/08/2014

    The United Nations Human Rights Council established the Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights on the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea) in 2013, tasked with investigating the alleged systematic, widespread and grave violations of human rights in North Korea, with a view to ensuring full accountability, particularly for violations which may amount to crimes against humanity. The Hon Michael Kirby was appointed as Chair of this Commission. As part of its investigations, the Commission conducted public hearings with more than 80 victims and other witnesses in Seoul, Tokyo, London and Washington D.C. The Commission’s report was made public in February 2014 and detailed many alleged crimes against humanity arising from ‘policies established at the highest level of State’ and called for urgent action from the international community. In this public lecture, Mr Kirby will be talking about his work on the Commission and the human rights situation in North Korea.

  • Blow up the lecture - II
    Blow up the lecture - II
    Duration: 01h21min | 06/08/2014

    What if the traditional lecture became a thing of the past? Are there some forms of learning that are better suited to computers than the classroom? Do students want to be talked at or talked to? Technology is opening up new ways to teach and learn and we want your opinion on what the classrooms of the future might look like. Featuring panellists: Professor Sanjay Sarma Director of Digital Learning, MIT Dr Joe Hope Physics Education Centre, ANU Ms Laura Wey Education Officer, ANUSA Chaired by ABC 666 Mornings Presenter Ms Genevieve Jacobs

  • New momentum: can the success in Bali transform the WTO?
    New momentum: can the success in Bali transform the WTO?
    Duration: 01h05min | 05/08/2014

    Director-General of the World Trade Organisation, Ambassador Roberto Azevêdo delivered a public lecture on the 17th of July 2014 at ANU entitled, New momentum: can the success in Bali transform the WTO? Ambassador Azevêdo discussed where the WTO should go next and reflected on how trade issues might play into the G20 process — a timely discussion in the lead up to Australia's hosting of the G20 Summit in November. Ambassador Azevêdo is the sixth Director-General of the WTO. In 2008 he was appointed Permanent Representative of Brazil to the WTO and other international economic organisations in Geneva. His appointment as Director-General of the WTO took effect on 1 September 2013 for a four-year term. Ambassador Azevêdo's expertise is international economics and he has published numerous articles on these issues. The ANU book with Brookings Institution - The G20 Summit at Five: Time for Strategic Leadership, as well as a similarly-themed East Asia Forum Quarterly, was launched on the day of the lecture. Thi

  • At the speed of volcanic eruptions
    At the speed of volcanic eruptions
    Duration: 54min | 04/08/2014

    What causes some eruptions to be more explosive than others? Is it the total driving gas fuel, or how fast the gas escapes? This lecture examines both the volatile content and the speed of magma ascent immediately prior to eruption. Chemical zonation preserved inside glass pockets and crystals provides one of the fastest clocks in geology. These timescales of chemical diffusion operate over minutes to hours in the run-up to eruption. Initial results show that more explosive eruptions may result from higher rates of magma ascent. Terry Plank is the Arthur D. Storke Memorial Professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. She is a geochemist who studies magmas associated with the plate tectonic cycle. She is known particularly for her studies of subduction zones: the inputs on the ocean floor, the temperatures attained beneath volcanoes, the melting process in the mantle, and the water contents of magmas before they erupt. Plank

  • Our bodies, whose property?
    Our bodies, whose property?
    Duration: 01h29min | 31/07/2014

    Claiming the body as property has been represented as the best way to ensure control over our own choices and lives; a crucial way of asserting our rights to bodily integrity; and an important means of protection against the abuse of our bodily materials by today's biotechnology companies. Refusing to see our bodies as property, it is argued, reflects either a religious view of the body as belonging to God, or a misguided sentimentalism that blocks clear thinking about matters such as prostitution, surrogate motherhood, and the sale of spare kidneys. Since we trade in our bodies whenever we work for a wage, there is no reason to view markets in sex or reproduction as a problem. Drawing on feminist arguments about the self as embodied, I argue that it is indeed a problem to think of the body as property, and a problem to view the body as a marketable substance. My minimal claim is that we do not need to assert property in the body in order to express what we mainly care about when we say ‘it’s my body’, which

  • Gender Institute 3rd Anniversary Event
    Gender Institute 3rd Anniversary Event
    Duration: 01h24min | 31/07/2014

    The Gender Institute marked its 3rd anniversary on Friday 21 March 2014 with an inspirational lecture and discussion with Sex Discrimination Commissioner Ms Elizabeth Broderick from the Australian Human Rights Commission, who spoke on; "Progressing gender equity and the role of male champions of change" Commissioner Broderick was introduced by ANU Vice-Chancellor Professor Ian Young, AO who lauded her committed advocacy and confirmed ANU support for her goals: preventing violence against women and sexual harassment, improving lifetime economic security for women, balancing paid work and unpaid caring responsibilities, promoting women’s representation in leadership, and strengthening gender equality laws, monitoring and agencies. Over 100 people attended the event and enjoyed a light lunch in the Hedley Bull reception area prior to proceedings. The 2013 student prizes for excellence in gender research were awarded by the Vice-Chancellor. The Gender Institute extends congratulations to all this years recipie

  • 2014 Schuman Lecture: Indo-Pacific Lessons from a European Experiment
    2014 Schuman Lecture: Indo-Pacific Lessons from a European Experiment
    Duration: 37min | 08/07/2014

    The European project was an attempt to pursue a strategic objective by economic means: continental peace by way of coal and steel. More than 60 years on, if measured against that original set of goalposts, it has been a successful project. Indeed, the lure of European peace and prosperity has been so attractive that the EU has grown dramatically in the last two decades. Yet Europe has many detractors, who point to the challenges of monetary without fiscal union and responding to Russian aggression as failures of the supra-national model initiated by Robert Schuman. What lessons can Australia’s region, the Indo-Pacific, draw from the European experiment. Mr Varghese took up his position as Secretary of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade on 3 December 2012. Prior to this appointment, Mr Varghese was Australia’s High Commissioner to India from 2009 to 2012. Between 2004 and 2009, he was Director-General of the Office of National Assessments. Before that he was the Senior Adviser (International) to the

  • Malcolm Fraser urges an end to Aust-US alliance
    Malcolm Fraser urges an end to Aust-US alliance
    Duration: 29min | 25/06/2014

    Former Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser, AC CH, has used a talk at ANU to argue for Australia to step back from the Australia-US ANZUS military alliance. Mr Fraser said Australia made a major strategic error and betrayed its national interest by not showing strategic independence from the United States after the fall of the Soviet Union. He warned that Australia needs to be careful not to follow the US into another war, which could potentially be in the Pacific and involve China. "I don't want Australia to follow America into a fourth war, blindly, unthinkingly, with little regard for Australia's national interest and little regard for our security," he says. His talk, at the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy, was based on his new book Dangerous Allies. Mr Fraser, Prime Minister from late 1975 until 1983, drew on his contribution to the flagship journal of the Crawford School, Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies (APPS). In his APPS piece, Mr Fraser writes that the country made a serious mistake by align

  • Cybersecurity- Mapping The Ethical Terrain
    Cybersecurity- Mapping The Ethical Terrain
    Duration: 01h03min | 25/06/2014

    Governments and society are increasingly reliant on cyber systems. That reliance makes us vulnerable to cyber attacks, which can have powerful impacts on people's lives. Because of this, in liberal democratic societies governments have a duty to ensure cybersecurity in order to protect their citizens and, arguably, the people of other nations. But as recent events following the revelations of Edward Snowden have demonstrated, there is a risk that their pursuit of cybersecurity might overstep the mark and subvert the fundamental right to privacy. In this NSC seminar, the presenters will demonstrate that managing the risks of cybersecurity involves trade-offs: between security and privacy; individual rights and the good of a society; and between the types of burdens placed on particular groups in order to protect others. These trade-offs are often ethical in nature, involving questions of how we act, what values we should aim to promote, and what means of anticipating and responding to the risks are reasonably

  • Jeffrey Sachs - Strategies for deep decarbonisation of the global energy system
    Jeffrey Sachs - Strategies for deep decarbonisation of the global energy system
    Duration: 01h13min | 25/06/2014

    Energy lies at the heart of the world's sustainability challenge. On the one hand, abundant, accessible, low-cost energy is vital for economic prosperity. On the other hand, the world's pattern of energy use, based on fossil fuels, threatens massive future climate change with devastating potential consequences. The greatest sustainability challenge, therefore, is to meet the energy needs of a growing world economy while moving to a safer pattern of energy use. In this talk Jeffrey Sachs will discuss strategies for creating a road map on deep decarbonisation to ensure the world can have the energy that it needs for prosperity while reducing CO2 emissions drastically. Jeffrey D Sachs is a world-renowned professor of economics, a leader in sustainable development, senior UN advisor, bestselling author, and syndicated columnist whose monthly newspaper columns appear in more than 80 countries. He serves as Director of The Earth Institute at Columbia University, as well as Quetelet Professor of Sustainable Developm

  • Indonesias Ascent: Power, Leadership and Asias Security Order
    Indonesia's Ascent: Power, Leadership and Asia's Security Order
    Duration: 01h29min | 24/06/2014

    As Indonesia's economy grows, it is increasingly being referred to as a rising middle power and there is mounting speculation that Indonesia might eventually join the ranks of Asia's great powers. Regardless of just how far Indonesia will rise, its government and the will of its people will become increasingly influential in terms of its regional leadership and the values and norms Jakarta espouses. What are the domestic opportunities and constraints that inform Indonesia's rise and how will various domestic contexts affect Indonesia's foreign policy and the values it espouses? Meanwhile, the image of Indonesia as a more stable and democratic nation has contributed to a significant deepening of security ties with some other nations (such as Australia) and these nations may well grasp the opportunity to continue doing so as Indonesia rises. But how might this be perceived amongst our other Southeast Asian neighbours and how might this affect our relations with them? Within Southeast Asia, what will the rise of

  • Pamela Denoon Lecture 2014: Wendy McCarthy AO
    Pamela Denoon Lecture 2014: Wendy McCarthy AO
    Duration: 01h01min | 13/06/2014

    This year the annual Pamela Denoon lecture will be presented by Wendy McCarthy AO under the title: Past victories, present challenges: Has Feminism failed Australian women? Further event details to follow. About the lecture The Pamela Denoon Lecture was inaugurated in 1989 as a tribute to the memory of Pamela Denoon and as a reminder that the gains that have been made by women over the years have only been possible because of the enormous dedication of women like Pamela. Pamela Denoon worked tirelessly to promote equality for women and was the National Coordinator of Women’s Electoral Lobby from 1982-84. She actively lobbied for women’s rights in Canberra during the 1980s and her bequest helped establish the National Foundation for Australian Women and the Pamela Denoon Trust. The Pamela Denoon Lecture is a regular event during International Women’s Week in Canberra. Speakers have included politicians, academics and a few more well-known personalities such as Judy Horacek, Anne Summers and Julie McCross

  • The Golson Lecture - Why did our ancestors become farmers?
    The Golson Lecture - Why did our ancestors become farmers?
    Duration: 01h07min | 13/06/2014

    The Golson Lecture was delivered at ANU by Professor Graeme Barker (Disney Professor of Archaeology and Director of the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge) on the 21st May, 2014. Jack Golson's excavations at Kuk in New Guinea have been a fundamental contribution to one of the greatest research problems in archaeology: why did our ancestors become farmers? Ten thousand years ago most people on the globe lived by hunting and gathering. Five thousand years ago most people lived by farming, or by combining farming with hunting and gathering. Today most of the world's population depends for their food on half a dozen plants and, if they are rich enough, on the products of half a dozen animals. So why did our ancestors first become farmers? Did people choose to experiment with domesticating plants and animals, and if so why? Were they pushed into becoming farmers by forces beyond their control like climate change or population pressure? How important were hard-to-study things l

  • The future of education in an online world
    The future of education in an online world
    Duration: 01h03min | 14/03/2014

    Is it time to reimagine how we learn? Should we be moving from lecture halls to e-spaces – from books to tablets?Technology is opening up new ways to teach and learn. It is also opening up new ways to understand how we learn. Australian universities are increasingly rethinking the delivery of their educational programs by making the foray into Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). MOOCs are a growing phenomenon in the higher education sector – complementing existing face-to-face courses and opening doors to students who might not have had the means to pursue tertiary-level education. Will edX and other MOOCs providers change the face of education forever? Join us for a special panel conversation examining these questions and more. Featuring panellists: Professor Anant Agarwal President of edX and social entrepreneur Professor Brian Schmidt AC Astrophysicist, Nobel Laureate and co-leader of the first ANU edX course Chaired by Julie Hare, Editor of the Higher Education section for The Australian.

  • Blow Up the Lecture
    Blow Up the Lecture
    Duration: 01h27min | 14/03/2014

    Is the traditional lecture on the way out? What will the classroom of the future look like? Will the digital world transform the physical world of learning? Will edX and other Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) providers change the face of education forever? Technology is opening up new ways to teach and learn. It is also opening up new ways to understand how we learn. What do you think the future of learning should look like at ANU? Featuring panellists Professor Anant Agarwal President of edX and social entrepreneur Dr Inger Mewburn (The Thesis Whisperer) Director of Research Training at ANU Dr Paul Francis Astrophysicist and co-leader of the first ANU edX course Professor Andrew Walker Deputy Dean, ANU College of Asia and the Pacific Mr Cam Wilson ANUSA President Chaired by ANU Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) Professor Marnie Hughes-Warrington

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