The Guardian's Audio Long Reads

Synopsis

The Guardian's Audio Long Reads podcasts are a selection of the  Guardians long read articles which are published in the paper and online. It gives you the opportunity to get on with your day whilst listening to some of the finest journalism the Guardian has to offer: in-depth writing from around the world on immigration, crime, business, the arts and much more.

Episodes

  •  From the archives: The man who sleeps in Hitler’s bed

    From the archives: The man who sleeps in Hitler’s bed

    22/07/2020 Duration: 36min

    We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: Kevin Wheatcroft has quietly amassed the world’s largest collection of Nazi memorabilia. Now he wants to share it with the world. What is behind this dark obsession?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  A chain of stupidity: the Skripal case and the decline of Russias spy agencies

    'A chain of stupidity': the Skripal case and the decline of Russia's spy agencies

    20/07/2020 Duration: 35min

    The unmasking of the Salisbury poisoning suspects by a new digital journalism outfit was an embarrassment for Putin – and evidence that Russian spies are not what they once were. By Luke Harding. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  Party and protest: the radical history of gay liberation, Stonewall and Pride

    Party and protest: the radical history of gay liberation, Stonewall and Pride

    17/07/2020 Duration: 40min

    A police raid on a gay bar in New York led to the birth of the Pride movement half a century ago – but the fight for LGBTQ+ rights goes back much further than that. By Huw Lemmey. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  From the archives: Can we reverse the ageing process by putting young blood into older people?

    From the archives: Can we reverse the ageing process by putting young blood into older people?

    15/07/2020 Duration: 36min

    We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: A series of experiments has produced incredible results by giving young blood to old mice. Now the findings are being tested on humans. Ian Sample meets the scientists whose research could transform our lives. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  You have to take action: one hospital cleaner’s journey through the pandemic

    'You have to take action': one hospital cleaner’s journey through the pandemic

    13/07/2020 Duration: 38min

    After years of outsourcing, many essential staff work for the NHS without receiving its benefits. In one London hospital, the fight is on for a better deal. By Sophie Elmhirst. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  The end of tourism?

    The end of tourism?

    10/07/2020 Duration: 40min

    The pandemic has devastated global tourism, and many will say ‘good riddance’ to overcrowded cities and rubbish-strewn natural wonders. Is there any way to reinvent an industry that does so much damage? By Christopher de Bellaigue. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  From the archives – Karachi vice: inside the city torn apart by killings, extortion and terrorism

    From the archives – Karachi vice: inside the city torn apart by killings, extortion and terrorism

    08/07/2020 Duration: 35min

    We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: Amid the mayhem that has turned parts of Karachi into no-go zones, reporters risk their lives to make sense of a crime wave that is virtually an insurgency. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  My four miscarriages: why is losing a pregnancy so shrouded in mystery?

    My four miscarriages: why is losing a pregnancy so shrouded in mystery?

    06/07/2020 Duration: 37min

    After losing four pregnancies, Jennie Agg set out to unravel the science of miscarriage. Then, a few months in, she found out she was pregnant again – just as the coronavirus pandemic hit. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  How a small Spanish town became one of Europes worst Covid-19 hotspots

    How a small Spanish town became one of Europe's worst Covid-19 hotspots

    03/07/2020 Duration: 30min

    In the northern region of La Rioja, one medieval town has suffered a particularly deadly outbreak. And in such a tight-knit community, suspicion and recrimination can spread as fast as the virus. By Giles Tremlett. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  From the archives: The clean, green and slightly bonkers world of CBeebies

    From the archives: The clean, green and slightly bonkers world of CBeebies

    01/07/2020 Duration: 27min

    We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2016: CBeebies isn’t just a channel, it’s a culture – and as a new parent you have little choice but to surrender to it. By Sophie Elmhirst. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  How Hong Kong caught fire: the story of a radical uprising

    How Hong Kong caught fire: the story of a radical uprising

    29/06/2020 Duration: 37min

    Hong Kong used to be seen as cautious, pragmatic and materialistic. But in the past year, an increasingly bold protest movement has transformed the city. Now, as Beijing tightens its grip, how much longer can the movement survive? By Tania Branigan and Lily Kuo. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  The power of crowds

    The power of crowds

    26/06/2020 Duration: 34min

    Even before the pandemic, mass gatherings were under threat from draconian laws and corporate seizure of public space. Yet history shows that the crowd always finds a way to return. By Dan Hancox. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  From the archive: One lawyer’s crusade to defend extreme pornography

    From the archive: One lawyer’s crusade to defend extreme pornography

    24/06/2020 Duration: 53min

    We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: Myles Jackman is on a mission to change Britain’s obscenity laws. For him, it’s more than a job – it’s a moral calling. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  What black America means to Europe

    What black America means to Europe

    22/06/2020 Duration: 23min

    Many have attempted to claim that ‘things are better here’ for black people than in the US. This ignores both Europe’s colonial past and its own racist present. By Gary Younge. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  The man in the iron lung

    The man in the iron lung

    19/06/2020 Duration: 36min

    When he was six, Paul Alexander contracted polio and was paralysed for life. Today he is 74, and one of the last people in the world still using an iron lung. But after surviving one deadly outbreak, he did not expect to find himself threatened by another. By Linda Rodriguez McRobbie. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  From the archives: The gangsters on Englands doorstep

    From the archives: The gangsters on England's doorstep

    17/06/2020 Duration: 44min

    We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This time we revisit Felicity Lawrence’s 2016 report on the exploitation of migrant labour in the UK: In the bleak flatlands of East Anglia, workers are controlled by criminal gangs, and some are forced to commit crimes to pay off their debts. This is what happens when cheap labour is our only priority. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  Extremist cops: how US law enforcement is failing to police itself

    Extremist cops: how US law enforcement is failing to police itself

    15/06/2020 Duration: 26min

    For decades, anti-government and white supremacist groups have been attempting to recruit police officers – and the authorities themselves aren’t even certain about the scale of the problem. By Maddy Crowell and Sylvia Varnham O’Regan. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  Bad ancestors: does the climate crisis violate the rights of those yet to be born?

    Bad ancestors: does the climate crisis violate the rights of those yet to be born?

    12/06/2020 Duration: 24min

    Our environmental vandalism has made urgent the question of ethical responsibilities across decades and centuries. By Astra Taylor. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  From the archive: Why would someone steal the world’s rarest water lily?

    From the archive: Why would someone steal the world’s rarest water lily?

    10/06/2020 Duration: 41min

    For the next few weeks we will be raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week’s pick: In January 2014, an endangered plant was taken from Kew Gardens, only a few years after scientists saved it from extinction. Sam Knight investigates what happens when plant obsession turns criminal. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  Cholera and coronavirus: why we must not repeat the same mistakes

    Cholera and coronavirus: why we must not repeat the same mistakes

    08/06/2020 Duration: 29min

    Cholera has largely been beaten in the west, but it still kills tens of thousands of people in poorer countries every year. As we search for a cure for coronavirus, we have to make sure it will be available to everyone, not just to those in wealthy nations. By Neil Singh. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

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