60-second Science

Synopsis

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American . To view all of our archived podcasts please go to www.scientificamerican.com/podcast

Episodes

  • Beetle Liberation Due to Regurgitation

    Beetle Liberation Due to Regurgitation

    14/02/2018 Duration: 02min

    The bombardier beetle can spray its hot brew of toxic chemicals even after bring swallowed, to force a predator into vomiting it back out.

  • Old Trees Are Ecosystem Gold

    Old Trees Are Ecosystem Gold

    13/02/2018 Duration: 01min

    David Lindenmayer of the Australian National University College of Science in Canberra says that older trees play outsize roles in maintaining landscapes and ecosystems.

  • Boat Noise Means Fish Cant Learn Their Lessons

    Boat Noise Means Fish Can't Learn Their Lessons

    11/02/2018 Duration: 02min

    Damselfish had trouble learning to avoid predators, when that lesson was accompanied by a soundtrack of buzzing boat engines. Christopher Intagliata reports.

  • Woodpeckers Drum to Their Own Tunes

    Woodpeckers Drum to Their Own Tunes

    07/02/2018 Duration: 01min

    The length and spacing of woodpecker drum rolls varies enough to tell woodpeckers apart—which could be useful to conservation biologists. Christopher Intagliata reports.

  • Homebodies Economize on Energy Use

    Homebodies Economize on Energy Use

    06/02/2018 Duration: 02min

    Today’s work-from-home, on-demand culture means more days at home—and translates into greater energy savings, too. Karen Hopkin reports.

  • Killer Whale Culture Revealed by Mimicking Us

    Killer Whale Culture Revealed by Mimicking Us

    03/02/2018 Duration: 01min

    Orcas can imitate calls from other whales and even human speech—suggesting they can transmit cultural practices, such as unique dialects. Christopher Intagliata reports.

  • Holiday Cheer Leads to Birth-Rate Spike

    Holiday Cheer Leads to Birth-Rate Spike

    02/02/2018 Duration: 03min

    During feel-good holiday periods like Christmas and Eid-al-Fitr, romance strikes—leading to a boom in births nine months later. Karen Hopkin reports.

  • Ticks on Uptick Where Big Game Declines

    Ticks on Uptick Where Big Game Declines

    01/02/2018 Duration: 02min

    Areas of Kenya without large wildlife saw tick populations rise as much as 370 percent—meaning more danger to humans. Jason G. Goldman reports.

  • Wildfires Spike Wine with Smoky Notes

    Wildfires Spike Wine with Smoky Notes

    30/01/2018 Duration: 02min

    Chemists are working on ways for wildfire-affected winemakers to avoid creating smoky wines. Christopher Intagliata reports.

  • Lion Conservation Challenges Giraffe Protection

    Lion Conservation Challenges Giraffe Protection

    26/01/2018 Duration: 02min

    Having lions and giraffes together in protected areas means far lower survival rates for juvenile giraffes. Jason Goldman reports.

  • Nobelist Crafts Light-Switchable Antibiotics

    Nobelist Crafts Light-Switchable Antibiotics

    26/01/2018 Duration: 01min

    Drugs modified by chemistry Nobel laureate Ben Feringa can be turned on and off by light, which could help keep bacteria from developing antibiotic resistance.

  • Catching Flu Also Boosts Heart Risk

    Catching Flu Also Boosts Heart Risk

    25/01/2018 Duration: 01min

    Researchers found a sixfold increase in heart attacks in patients in the week following a flu. Christopher Intagliata reports.

  • Worldwide Effort Says Together Science Can

    Worldwide Effort Says Together Science Can

    23/01/2018 Duration: 01min

    Jeremy Farrar, director of the Wellcome Trust, talked about worldwide scientific collaboration today at the World Economic Forum.  

  • Canada Geese Taking a Winter Staycation

    Canada Geese Taking a Winter Staycation

    22/01/2018 Duration: 02min

    The geese are wintering farther and farther north, in urban areas like Chicago—which may help them avoid hunters. Emily Schwing reports.

  • Moons Tug Doesnt Cause Big Quakes

    Moon's Tug Doesn't Cause Big Quakes

    20/01/2018 Duration: 01min

    An analysis of more than 200 earthquakes over the past four centuries concludes there's no connection between moon phases and big earthquakes. Christopher Intagliata reports.

  • Social Media Helps ID Spew Source

    Social Media Helps ID Spew Source

    19/01/2018 Duration: 02min

    Surveillance of Yelp restaurant reviews for terms like vomit led researchers to the sources of foodborne illness outbreaks. Karen Hopkin reports. 

  • Salmonella Could Have Caused 16th-Century Epidemic

    Salmonella Could Have Caused 16th-Century Epidemic

    18/01/2018 Duration: 01min

    Using a new algorithm, geneticists uncovered the pathogen that could have caused a massive epidemic in the Aztec empire: Salmonella bacteria. Christopher Intagliata reports.

  • Which Came First, the Proboscis or the Flower?

    Which Came First, the Proboscis or the Flower?

    13/01/2018 Duration: 02min

    A new fossil find reveals that the sucking tongue of butterflies—or proboscis—appears to have evolved before the emergence of flowers. Christopher Intagliata reports.

  • You Live in a Strange Solar System

    You Live in a Strange Solar System

    11/01/2018 Duration: 01min

    Astronomers found that other star systems tend to host similarly sized exoplanets—far different from ours. Christopher Intagliata reports.

  • Glow Sticks Help Ecologists Study Amphibians

    Glow Sticks Help Ecologists Study Amphibians

    10/01/2018 Duration: 02min

    Ecologists needed a way to more easily keep track of populations of amphibians, and green glow sticks lit the way.

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