The Economist Radio (All audio)

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Synopsis

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Episodes

  • Babbage: Variations on a gene

    Babbage: Variations on a gene

    03/03/2021 Duration: 24min

    As global vaccination efforts continue, how is the coronavirus mutating to stay ahead? The head of Britain's covid-19 genomics consortium explains why genetic sequencing is crucial. Also, how studying individual cancer genes may improve precision treatments. And an AI for an eye—host Kenneth Cukier investigates the potential of AI in medicine first hand.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Owing to the pandemic: Britain’s budget

    Owing to the pandemic: Britain’s budget

    03/03/2021 Duration: 22min

    The finance minister has a plan that will keep many safeguards in place—for now. We ask how the country will then dig itself out of a financial hole. As countries aim for net-zero emissions, how to pick the policies that do the most good for the least cash? And why every fruit tree in Zanzibar has an owner. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money Talks: Bonds, shaken and stirred

    Money Talks: Bonds, shaken and stirred

    02/03/2021 Duration: 25min

    Last week’s turmoil in the bond market has calmed for now, but fears of inflation mean more turbulence ahead. Plus, how poor countries trying to secure debt relief are caught in a minefield of lenders’ competing priorities and egos. And, host Simon Long takes a lesson from a former hostage negotiator in the secrets of successful listening.For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A dark picture emerges: atrocities in Ethiopia

    A dark picture emerges: atrocities in Ethiopia

    02/03/2021 Duration: 22min

    It is becoming more certain that war crimes are being committed in the northern region of Tigray. Yet, despite increasing international pressure, there is little hope the suffering will soon end. In China anti-capitalist sentiment is growing online; overworked youth have a decidedly Maoist view of the country’s biggest businesses and tycoons. And the uphill struggles of France’s skiing industry.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Jab: Will there be enough vaccines?

    The Jab: Will there be enough vaccines?

    01/03/2021 Duration: 40min

    It is one thing to design and test covid-19 vaccines. It is another to make them at sufficient scale to generate the billions of doses needed to vaccinate the world’s population. How are the vaccines produced, why is production so variable and will it meet demand this year?We speak to Adar Poonawalla, CEO of the Serum Institute of India, the world's biggest supplier of vaccines. The Economist’s technology correspondent Hal Hodson explains why some vaccines take longer to produce than others. James Fransham from our data team discusses when supply will meet demand.Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. Oliver Morton, The Economist's briefing editor, joins them.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience and data newsletter at economist.com/offthecharts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out inf

  • Coup fighters: Myanmar’s persistent protesters

    Coup fighters: Myanmar’s persistent protesters

    01/03/2021 Duration: 20min

    The temperature keeps rising: as demonstrations continue to grow, the army is becoming more brutal. We ask how the country can escape the cycle of violence. In a pandemic, laws against misinformation have their merits—but are also easily put to work for censorious governments. And why British dependencies want to get growing in the medical-marijuana game.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: March 1st 2021

    Editor’s Picks: March 1st 2021

    01/03/2021 Duration: 29min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the superpowers' tug of war for South-East Asia, America digital markets shift towards oligopolies (09:48) the future of homeschooling post pandemic (18:54)Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: Back problems

    Checks and Balance: Back problems

    26/02/2021 Duration: 41min

    “America is back” President Biden has told allies. Hard power, including a fearsome nuclear weapons arsenal, is the foundation of America’s global influence. But many Democrats would like to demilitarise foreign policy. Can Joe Biden live up to his own rhetoric as he tries to re-engage with the world? We hear from Shashank Joshi, The Economist’s defence editor, and Fiona Hill, who advised President Trump on Russia. Our obituaries editor Ann Wroe profiles George Shultz, architect of the first arms control treaty. John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Mutual-appreciation anxiety: Putin and Erdogan

    Mutual-appreciation anxiety: Putin and Erdogan

    26/02/2021 Duration: 20min

    The presidents of Turkey and Russia make an odd couple; their former empires have clashed over centuries. We look at the fragile—but nonetheless worrisome—alliance between Vladimir Putin and Recep Tayyip Erdogan. India’s economy is recovering but a longstanding drag on growth persists: the overwhelming fraction of women absent from the labour force. And an unlikely protest anthem rattles Cuba’s regime. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist Asks: Fiona Hill

    The Economist Asks: Fiona Hill

    25/02/2021 Duration: 31min

    How should President Joe Biden deal with President Vladimir Putin? At a point of “acute confrontation” between America and Russia, Fiona Hill, former official at the US National Security Council and expert on Russia, tells Anne McElvoy how post-Trump relations might look. Also, why Russian opposition figurehead Alexei Navalny is like Harry Potter— challenging a ruthless leader. Also, was Hill herself poisoned on a research trip in Russia in 2002?For full access to the print, digital and audio editions of The Economist subscribe at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Hell for Tether: a cryptocurrency crimped

    Hell for Tether: a cryptocurrency crimped

    25/02/2021 Duration: 22min

    The notionally dollar-pegged “stablecoin” quietly underpins many crypto-market moves. We ask what the currency issuer’s clash with New York authorities means for the wider crypto craze. In many African countries, parliamentarians are asked to fill public-service gaps—at great personal cost. We examine moves toward a fairer forking out of funds. And why physical-education exams are popping up in China.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Collusions and collisions

    Babbage: Collusions and collisions

    24/02/2021 Duration: 26min

    After Facebook reached a deal with Australia, the tech giants are coming under fire once again -- this time from each other. Are their cosy monopolies under threat? Also, The Economist’s defence editor investigates the multi-billion dollar industry which exploits vulnerabilities in vital software. And, how whales could help the study of seismology in the ocean. Kenneth Cukier hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Let the games be thin: Tokyo’s Olympic tussles

    Let the games be thin: Tokyo’s Olympic tussles

    24/02/2021 Duration: 21min

    Planners are in a corner. Delaying or cancelling the summer tournament looks like defeat; pressing ahead looks like a danger. We take a look at the sporting chances. Britain has decarbonised faster than any other rich country, but getting to “net zero” will be a whole lot harder. And why South Koreans have such trouble with noisy neighbours.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money Talks: Pricing pollution

    Money Talks: Pricing pollution

    23/02/2021 Duration: 26min

    Could the success of the world’s biggest carbon market provide a model for the world? Plus, Cristina Junqueira, cofounder of Nubank, a Brazilian digital bank, on how the pandemic is supercharging the fintech revolution. And, why sports cards’ leap from the schoolyard to the stock exchange reveals the growing financial power of social networks. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Confirmation biases: Biden’s cabinet picks

    Confirmation biases: Biden’s cabinet picks

    23/02/2021 Duration: 20min

    President Joe Biden’s top posts are shaping up as Senate confirmation hearings continue—but some controversial nominations await a vote. We look at who is on the docket. Politics in the Democratic Republic of Congo has become messy, at the expense of some promised and much-needed reforms. And why the global rap scene is picking up a London accent. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Jab: Are the vaccines effective enough?

    The Jab: Are the vaccines effective enough?

    22/02/2021 Duration: 36min

    Three vaccines have been approved by stringent regulators. Ten are being used in one or more countries. How do they work and are they effective enough against new variants of the coronavirus?Sarah Gilbert, inventor of the Oxford/Astrazeneca vaccine, tells us adapting to new variants should be easy. The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief David Rennie reports from China, which faces a huge test of its homegrown vaccine technology as it tries to re-open. James Fransham from our data team on how far the variants have spread.Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. Slavea Chankova, The Economist's health-care correspondent, joins them.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The World Ahead: When cities breathe out

    The World Ahead: When cities breathe out

    22/02/2021 Duration: 20min

    Covid-19 has dented the prosperity, populations and popularity of big cities around the world. But adapting to shocks is what great cities do. How will urban centres change in the post-pandemic world and what are the political implications of a shift towards more remote working from suburban areas? Tom Standage hosts. Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Contrary to popular opinion: Mexico’s president

    Contrary to popular opinion: Mexico’s president

    22/02/2021 Duration: 19min

    Andrés Manuel López Obrador roared into office with a grand “fourth transformation” agenda. Even after two years of policy failures and power-grabbing, he remains wildly popular. An eye-catching new report implores economists to take biodiversity into account—and puts some sobering limits on growth. And a chat through the state of the art in conversational computers.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: February 22nd 2021

    Editor’s Picks: February 22nd 2021

    22/02/2021 Duration: 19min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, America’s ambitious attempt to deal with climate change, why SPACs are a useful way to take firms public (08:52) and how data on inbred nobles support a leader-driven theory of history (15:16)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: The switch

    Checks and Balance: The switch

    19/02/2021 Duration: 45min

    Plans to overhaul American energy will soon come before Congress. There will never be a better chance for Joe Biden to show real ambition on climate. If the blackouts in Texas are any guide, it would not just be the world that thanks him, but Americans, too. But the politics of greening America are never easy. What might the new president get done?We hear from John Kerry, Mr Biden’s climate envoy, Varshini Prakash of Sunrise, a movement of young climate activists who helped get the new president elected, and from West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin, whose vote will be crucial in passing new laws.John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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