The Economist Radio (All audio)

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Synopsis

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Episodes

  • A word in edgewise: Turkey, Armenia and genocide

    A word in edgewise: Turkey, Armenia and genocide

    29/04/2021 Duration: 22min

    In calling the 1915 campaign against Armenians a genocide, President Joe Biden has rekindled tensions that never really faded—and has perhaps delayed a rapprochement. Chinese authorities fear religion, particularly when it is practised out of sight; we look at increasing repression of China’s tens of millions of Christians. And tracking the coronavirus’s spread by dipping into Britain’s sewers.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Post-covid syndrome

    Babbage: Post-covid syndrome

    28/04/2021 Duration: 27min

    As research on long covid advances, how should countries respond to the impending public health emergency? Also, new hope in the fight against malaria in the form of a highly effective vaccine. And, why the sound of nature might be good for your health. Kenneth Cukier hosts A note for our listeners: from May 4th 2021 Babbage will be published every Tuesday.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A great deal to be desired: Europe-Britain trade

    A great deal to be desired: Europe-Britain trade

    28/04/2021 Duration: 21min

    Europe’s parliament has overwhelmingly voted to extend a stopgap trade agreement. But the rancour behind the vote, and the deal’s thin measures, say much about future relations. Female soldiers are entering armed forces in big numbers, but they still face barriers both in getting the job and in doing it. And China’s homegrown Oscar-winning director is scrubbed from its internet. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money Talks: The QE quandary

    Money Talks: The QE quandary

    27/04/2021 Duration: 23min

    As economies recover, central bankers will need to decide what to do with their asset-purchase schemes and their enormous balance-sheets. We look at how quantitative easing was pioneered in Japan 20 years ago and why it is still a black box. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • SPAClash: the buzz and the bust

    SPAClash: the buzz and the bust

    27/04/2021 Duration: 20min

    Special-purpose acquisition companies offer a novel way for companies to list on stockmarkets. We look behind the buzz, and something of a recent bust, to discover why they are a useful innovation both for investors and markets. President Jair Bolsonaro wants every Brazilian citizen to have a gun—especially his supporters. And a visit to the world’s largest magazine archive.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Jab: What lessons have been learned?

    The Jab: What lessons have been learned?

    26/04/2021 Duration: 38min

    More than a billion vaccines have been administered. But the contrast between Israel, largely free of covid-19, and India, struggling with a catastrophic second wave, is stark. What explains the discrepancy?    Devi Sridhar, Founding Director of the Global Health Governance Programme, tells us what to expect as the next billion vaccines roll out. Alok Jha and Natasha Loder are joined by Slavea Chankova, The Economist’s health-care correspondent, and technology correspondent Hal Hodson. Anshel Pfeffer reports from Israel.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science and data newsletters at economist.com/simplyscience and economist.com/offthecharts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The World Ahead: Government via Siri

    The World Ahead: Government via Siri

    26/04/2021 Duration: 22min

    Governments’ efforts to move their services and operations online have been accelerated by the pandemic. Host Tom Standage finds out which countries are leading the way, and which are lagging behind. What are the barriers that must be overcome, and where is e-government heading next? Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Extremist prejudice: rebranding Navalny

    Extremist prejudice: rebranding Navalny

    26/04/2021 Duration: 23min

    Russian courts’ bid to designate opposition leader Alexei Navalny’s movement as a terrorist organisation is unsurprising: it fits a narrative of increasing repression at home and sabre-rattling at the borders. Africa’s vaccination drive is beset by shortcomings in both supply and demand; we examine the rising number of bottlenecks. And a forgotten African-American composer at last gets her due.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: April 26th 2021

    Editor’s Picks: April 26th 2021

    25/04/2021 Duration: 31min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Putin’s next move, the pandemic in India (10:20) and the rise of the robot critic (18:35).  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: Vlad, bad and dangerous

    Checks and Balance: Vlad, bad and dangerous

    23/04/2021 Duration: 42min

    Vladimir Putin has responded to a new US administration with typical thuggery. Russia’s main opposition leader is in prison and its military is again threatening Ukraine. Can Joe Biden deal with Russia more effectively than past presidents?The Economist’s James Bennet and Michael McFaul, a former US ambassador who was with Biden when he last met Putin, join the discussion. Plus we hear an excerpt from The Economist Asks with former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger.John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman.For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Carbon date: Biden’s climate summit

    Carbon date: Biden’s climate summit

    23/04/2021 Duration: 22min

    President Joe Biden laid out ambitious emissions targets yesterday, but in order to be taken seriously on climate change, America has some reputation rebuilding to do. Researchers are starting to understand why online meetings are so exhausting—and are pinpointing the up sides of work lives lived increasingly online. And the waning influence of awards shows such as this Sunday’s Oscars.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist Asks: Henry Kissinger

    The Economist Asks: Henry Kissinger

    22/04/2021 Duration: 42min

    How does the best-known veteran of foreign policy view the great global standoff today? Henry Kissinger is a titan of US politics — as Secretary of State and National Security Advisor in the Nixon and Ford administrations he brokered detente with the Soviet Union and orchestrated a breakthrough presidential visit to China in 1972. Incumbents have sought his insight long after he left the White House. Anne McElvoy asks him about the current threats to world order, how to handle Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping, and what he would have done differently when in office. And, following an Economist advert, are plane companions ever too inhibited to talk to him? Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Growth negligence: India’s covid-19 failings

    Growth negligence: India’s covid-19 failings

    22/04/2021 Duration: 19min

    Mass gatherings and in-person voting continue, even as new case numbers smash records and fatalities spiral in public view. We ask how a seeming pandemic success has turned so suddenly tragic. Chad’s president of three decades has been killed; that has implications for regional violence far beyond the country’s borders. And a deep dive on the international sea-cucumber trade.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Promising the earth

    Babbage: Promising the earth

    21/04/2021 Duration: 29min

    President Biden is hosting a virtual summit with world leaders on Thursday 22nd April aiming to convince countries to take bolder action on climate change. Does this mark a new era for American leadership on climate? With China and America at odds over human rights, security and economic competition, can they work together against this common threat? And will countries take sufficient action to meet the challenge at hand? Charlotte Howard hosts A note for our listeners: from May 4th 2021 Babbage will be published every Tuesday.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Insuperable: Europe’s football fiasco

    Insuperable: Europe’s football fiasco

    21/04/2021 Duration: 24min

    A “Super League” plan wrong-footed fans, clubs, even governments. We examine what the failed bid says about the sport’s economics. We return to the George Floyd case and the landmark conviction of his murderer. The Kurds have long sought their own state in the Middle East; that now looks as unlikely as ever. And why spelling is so persistently counter-intuitive.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money Talks: Less stick more carrot

    Money Talks: Less stick more carrot

    20/04/2021 Duration: 27min

    As America and its allies threaten more penalties against Russia over the treatment of opposition leader Alexei Navalny, does the West’s overdependence on economic sanctions risk making them ineffective? Also, why India is proving an attractive—and clever—investor in poor countries concerned about Chinese influence. And, do plans for a football Super League risk an own goal? Patrick Lane hosts A note for our listeners: from May 5th 2021 Money Talks will be published every Wednesday.For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A case rests, a city does not: Derek Chauvin’s trial

    A case rests, a city does not: Derek Chauvin’s trial

    20/04/2021 Duration: 22min

    The former police officer involved in George Floyd’s death awaits a verdict. What would conviction mean in a case emblematic of a far wider racial-justice movement? Internal migration has left a third of China’s young people separated from one or both parents—with serious costs and risks to those children. And the bid to make the art of tasting the province of engineering.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Jab: Can Europe turn the corner?

    The Jab: Can Europe turn the corner?

    19/04/2021 Duration: 35min

    The continent is suffering a third wave of covid-19 after the European Commission’s vaccine roll out stalled. French President Emmanuelle Macron has said Europe “lacked ambition” in its vaccine efforts. How can European countries catch up? Alok Jha and Natasha Loder are joined by Sophie Pedder, The Economist’s Paris bureau chief, Stanley Pignal, European business and finance correspondent, and Sondre Solstad, senior data journalist. For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science and data newsletters at economist.com/simplyscience and economist.com/offthecharts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Lai of the land: Hong Kong’s democrats quashed

    Lai of the land: Hong Kong’s democrats quashed

    19/04/2021 Duration: 21min

    Some of the territory’s most outspoken activists—from media mogul Jimmy Lai to “father of democracy” Martin Lee—have been sentenced. We look at what’s left of Hong Kong’s protest spirit. Scientists have been making hybrid animal “chimeras” for decades, but newly developed human-monkey embryos raise serious ethical questions. And how the Arab world is changing channels as propaganda consumes Egyptian television.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: April 19th 2021

    Editor’s Picks: April 19th 2021

    18/04/2021 Duration: 24min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, from United Kingdom to Untied Kingdom, corporations and democracy in America (09:00) and Myanmar: Asia’s next failed state (17:10).Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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