The Economist Radio (All audio)

Synopsis

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Episodes

  • Editor’s picks: November 28th 2019

    Editor’s picks: November 28th 2019

    28/11/2019 Duration: 25min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, inequality could be lower than you think (11:20), Britain’s Labour Party plans to redistribute political power as well as income (17:30), and Mexico’s President is using a crusade against corruption to take controlPlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Presidential SEAL: Donald Trump puts his stamp on military discipline

    Presidential SEAL: Donald Trump puts his stamp on military discipline

    28/11/2019 Duration: 22min

    Donald Trump used to lionise generals, but this week he had a falling out with the top brass. Are the armed forces becoming as politicised as America’s other institutions? We also take a look at the emergence of a new narco-state in West Africa, Guinea-Bissau. And Silicon Valley has been trying to shed a reputation for sexism, but many of its products remain ill-suited to women. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: AI: The end of the scientific method?

    Babbage: AI: The end of the scientific method?

    27/11/2019 Duration: 22min

    Researchers are using artificial intelligence techniques to invent medicines and materials—but in the process are they upending the scientific method itself? The AI approach is a form of trial-and-error at scale, or “radical empiricism”. But does AI-driven science uncover new answers that humans cannot understand? Host Kenneth Cukier finds out with James Field of LabGenius, Demis Hassabis of DeepMind, astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, tech venture capitalists Zavain Dar and Nan Li, philosophy professor Sabrina Leonelli, and others. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Global warning: The UN sounds the alarm on climate change

    Global warning: The UN sounds the alarm on climate change

    27/11/2019 Duration: 19min

    The UN has just released its annual report on how well the fight to slow climate change is going. It finds that efforts to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions are going from bad to worse. We also look at a surprising new lease on life for China’s regional dialects. And while people debate about the merits of Uber, one thing is clear -- it drives people to drink -- or so new research suggests. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Shopping for diamonds

    Money talks: Shopping for diamonds

    26/11/2019 Duration: 22min

    LVMH, a French luxury goods giant, is buying American jeweller Tiffany & Co for over $16bn. What are its plans for the latest jewel in its crown? Soumaya Keynes speaks to Stephen Vaughn, former general counsel to the United States Trade Representative, about a crisis at the heart of the World Trade Organisation. And, what lessons can be learned from the world’s most extreme economies? Patrick Lane hosts___________________ For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, go to www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Start spreading the cash: Michael Bloomberg runs for president

    Start spreading the cash: Michael Bloomberg runs for president

    26/11/2019 Duration: 20min

    Michael Bloomberg, the billionaire former mayor of New York, has announced he is running for president. But he is late to join the race and not very popular with Democratic primary voters. We also look at TikTok, a wildly successful video-sharing app, that some see as a threat to security in the Western world. And much of Switzerland is up in arms--about the reliability of the country’s coffee supply. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The world ahead: Small COP, big COP

    The world ahead: Small COP, big COP

    25/11/2019 Duration: 24min

    On the eve of the 2019 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP25) in Madrid, we ask what delegates hope to achieve. Also, how can online games help in the fight against fake news? And host Tom Standage interviews an artificial intelligence called GPT-2 about its views on the big themes of 2020. Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0) “The World in 2020”, our future-gazing annual, is now available at shop.economist.com  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Protest vote: Hong Kongers send a message to Beijing

    Protest vote: Hong Kongers send a message to Beijing

    25/11/2019 Duration: 22min

    After almost six months of protests and street battles, Hong Kongers have had a chance to vote in local elections. They sent a clear message of support to those agitating for greater democracy. We look at how the impeachment hearings in Washington are undermining the fight against corruption in Eastern Europe. And deep below Jerusalem, a high-tech cemetery is under construction. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Is NATO experiencing “brain death”?

    The Economist asks: Is NATO experiencing “brain death”?

    22/11/2019 Duration: 23min

    The secretary general of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation, Jens Stoltenberg, reacts to Emmanuel Macron’s stark warnings about the future of the alliance. Daniel Franklin, The Economist’s diplomatic editor, asks Mr Stoltenberg how NATO’s members can overcome their differences—should Europe have its own defence force and is Turkey at risk of drifting away from the alliance? Also, how should Article 5 be enforced in space?For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe ateconomist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bibi in the corner: Binyamin Netanyahu’s indictment

    Bibi in the corner: Binyamin Netanyahu’s indictment

    22/11/2019 Duration: 21min

    After years of investigations, Israel’s prime minister has been indicted. A fraught legal case will complicate the already messy business of cobbling together a government. We examine the work of a pioneering sociologist to understand the causes and consequences of eviction in America. And Leonardo da Vinci’s vineyard has been faithfully recreated, and his wine is enjoying its own renaissance.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s picks: November 21st 2019

    Editor’s picks: November 21st 2019

    21/11/2019 Duration: 20min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Hong Kong is not the only part of China’s periphery to resent the heavy hand of the Communist party. (9:20) What happens when McKinsey, the high priesthood of management consultancy, is itself disrupted? (16:51) And, if disaster strikes, the Swiss want to be caffeinated____________________Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer____________________  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Fuel to the fire: growing unrest in Iran

    Fuel to the fire: growing unrest in Iran

    21/11/2019 Duration: 20min

    After petrol subsidies were slashed, protests of surprising ferocity have flared up across the country—and neither the government nor the demonstrators seem to be backing down. The illicit trade in rhinoceros horn threatens the animals’ survival, but scientists have come up with a convincing fake that could collapse the market. And the surprisingly subtle choices to balance meat-eating and environmentalism. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Reality check

    Babbage: Reality check

    20/11/2019 Duration: 23min

    Virtual reality continues to make people sick. Will the technology ever take off and is it designed for women? Leo Murray, from “Riding Sunbeams”, on using solar power to propel future commuter journeys. Also, how slippery toilets could reduce water-use. Alok Jha hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Settling in: Israel-Palestine policy

    Settling in: Israel-Palestine policy

    20/11/2019 Duration: 21min

    The American administration’s shifting position on Israeli settlements in the West Bank will have little immediate effect—but may end up sharply crimping hopes for a Palestinian state. The first debate ahead of Britain’s general election didn’t leave much room for the two main candidates to get past canned talking points. And how high-end gin is displacing the rot-gut variety in India.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Getting bizzy

    Money talks: Getting bizzy

    19/11/2019 Duration: 25min

    Ahead of the UK’s general election, party leaders courted businesses at the annual conference of the Confederation of British Industry. We ask the CBI’s chief economist Rain Newton-Smith what attendees made of their proposals. Also, Scott Kupor of Andreessen Horowitz reveals the secrets of success in the world of venture capitalism. And, why the future of gaming is in the cloud. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bits in pieces: a fragmenting internet

    Bits in pieces: a fragmenting internet

    19/11/2019 Duration: 22min

    The early vision for a borderless, unregulated internet has not panned out as its pioneers hoped. How to handle the “splinternet”? Doug Jones is Alabama’s first Democratic senator in a quarter of a century; in his moderate ways our correspondent finds broader lessons for the Democratic Party. And air pollution is a threat the world over—most of all to the well-being of children.Additional audio courtesy of Department of RecordsFor full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Futurewatch: The crypto craze

    Futurewatch: The crypto craze

    18/11/2019 Duration: 22min

    Is cryptocurrency the future of money? Helen Joyce, The Economist’s finance editor, explores whether digital coins can offer a viable alternative to existing currencies. And Tim Cross, The Economist’s technology editor, explains the blockchains that underpin them  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Head for the Hill: this week’s impeachment hearings

    Head for the Hill: this week’s impeachment hearings

    18/11/2019 Duration: 21min

    Democrats have a hard task as the hearings’ public stage proceeds: not uncovering new evidence, but building a robust public case for impeachment. The online-grocery business is tough—but that isn’t stopping e-commerce players big and small from trying to crack it. And it’s getting harder for artists to hang around on the album charts; new talent is coming in, and heading out, ever faster. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Esther Perel

    The Economist asks: Esther Perel

    15/11/2019 Duration: 27min

    What is the secret to a great working relationship? The psychotherapist, author and podcaster opens up about the key ingredients to collegiality in the office, millenials’ expectations of managers and the cult of the founder. Esther Perel also offers Anne McElvoy advice on managing her team.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Better the devil they know? Sri Lanka’s election

    Better the devil they know? Sri Lanka’s election

    15/11/2019 Duration: 21min

    After multiple suicide bombings in April, much campaigning has been about security. Will Sri Lankans vote tomorrow for the authoritarian-but-effective candidate, or the more untested peacemaker? We examine the growing nostalgia for Hosni Mubarak, who was ousted as Egypt’s president as part of the Arab Spring. And a trawl through historical records shows how long it took for William Shakespeare to reach real fame.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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